PEACH-LEAVED BELLFLOWER

Campanula persicifolia

Bellflower Family [Campanulaceae]

month8jun month8june month8jul month8july

status
statusZneophyte
flower
flower8azure
inner
inner8white
morph
morph8actino
petals
petalsZ5
type
typeZtrumpet
stem
stem8round
stem
stem8milkysap stem8milkylatex

18th July 2007, Macclesfield Canal, Sutton. Photo: © RWD
Frequent in gardens, escaped to the canalside. A low plant, with thin wiry stems and few stem leaves.


18th July 2009, Southport Dunes, Sefton Coast. Photo: © RWD
Seems to have a propensity for only three flowers open at any one time. Un-like Clustered Bellflower each flower is on a stalk.


18th July 2007, Macclesfield Canal, Sutton. Photo: © RWD
Five tapered pointed sepals at the rear support the 'bowl' of the flower which is twice as wide as a Harebell.


18th July 2007, Macclesfield Canal, Sutton. Photo: © RWD
The widest bowl of any Bellflower. Petals wide and short.


18th July 2007, Macclesfield Canal, Sutton. Photo: © RWD
The five petals curve over. This pale blue flower facing upward catching the rain like a dew pond.


18th July 2007, Macclesfield Canal, Sutton. Photo: © RWD
Petals slightly pointed similar in profile to {curly} brackets. The stigma splits into three a long way down un-like no other Bellflower reminiscent of a split cotter pin. Pinkish strips (anthers?) near bottom of 'bowl'.


18th July 2007, Macclesfield Canal, Sutton. Photo: © RWD
Flower bud similar to most other Bellflowers and Harebell.


18th July 2009, Southport Dunes, Sefton Coast. Photo: © RWD
Withered flowers.


18th July 2009, Southport Dunes, Sefton Coast. Photo: © RWD
Stem leaves more frequent nearer the base. Stiff, narrow and V-shaped similar in profile to aluminium tent pegs that have been often straightened. Plant is hairless.


Some similarities to : Clustered Bellflower but that has striking violet flowers that are clustered together at the top without flower stalks.

Uniquely identifiable characteristics

Distinguishing Feature : The very wide bowl-shape (almost washing-up-bowl like) shape of the 'bell'.

No relation to : Peach [a plant with similar name].

Grown in gardens, but readily escapes to woods and scrubs. A blue to pale blue shade, azure perhaps. The only bellflower to have such a very wide open bell end in relation to the length of the bell, and a stigma that splits into three for over 2/3rds of its length.

VIOLDELPHIN


Violdelphin is the anthocyanin that colours the blue flowers from the Campanula genus. It consists of an Anthocyanidin (Delphinidin) shown in blue, two para-HydroxyBenzoyl (4-HydroxyBenzoyl, derived from 4-HydrozyBenzoic Acid) moieties (shown in green) and four sugar units shown in red comprising three glucosyl units and one rhamnosyl unit. Compare this with Malonylawobanin anthocyanin found in Bluebells. The p-hydroxybenzoyl and sugar unit comprise a chromone which influences the light absorption spectrum and hence perceived colour. (In Malonylawobanin p-Hydroxybenzoyl moieties are absent, replaced instead by a Coumaryl unit).

Violdelphin is also found in the blue flowers of Delphinium hybridum, a horticultural plant or Canterbury-bells (Campanula medium).


  Campanula persicifolia  ⇐ Global Aspect ⇒ Campanulaceae  

Distribution
 family8Bellflower family8Campanulaceae

 BSBI maps
genus8Campanula
Campanula
(Bellflowers)

PEACH-LEAVED BELLFLOWER

Campanula persicifolia

Bellflower Family [Campanulaceae]

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