PEACH-LEAVED BELLFLOWER

Campanula persicifolia

Bellflower Family [Campanulaceae]

month8jun month8june month8jul month8july

status
statusZneophyte
flower
flower8azure
inner
inner8white
morph
morph8actino
petals
petalsZ5
type
typeZtrumpet
stem
stem8round
stem
stem8milkysap stem8milkylatex

18th July 2007, Macclesfield Canal, Sutton. Photo: © RWD
Frequent in gardens, escaped to the canalside. A low plant, with thin wiry stems and few stem leaves.


18th July 2009, Southport Dunes, Sefton Coast. Photo: © RWD
Seems to have a propensity for only three flowers open at any one time. Un-like Clustered Bellflower each flower is on a stalk.


18th July 2007, Macclesfield Canal, Sutton. Photo: © RWD
Five tapered pointed calyx teeth at the rear support the 'bowl' of the flower which is twice as wide as a Harebell.


18th July 2007, Macclesfield Canal, Sutton. Photo: © RWD
The widest bowl of any Bellflower. Petals wide and short.


18th July 2007, Macclesfield Canal, Sutton. Photo: © RWD
The five petals curve over. This pale blue flower facing upward catching the rain like a dew pond.


18th July 2007, Macclesfield Canal, Sutton. Photo: © RWD
Petals slightly pointed similar in profile to {curly} brackets. The stigma splits into three a long way down un-like no other Bellflower reminiscent of a split cotter pin. Pinkish strips (anthers?) near bottom of 'bowl'.


18th July 2007, Macclesfield Canal, Sutton. Photo: © RWD
Flower bud similar to most other Bellflowers and Harebell.


18th July 2009, Southport Dunes, Sefton Coast. Photo: © RWD
Withered flowers.


18th July 2009, Southport Dunes, Sefton Coast. Photo: © RWD
Stem leaves more frequent nearer the base. Stiff, narrow and V-shaped similar in profile to aluminium tent pegs that have been often straightened. Plant is hairless.


Some similarities to : Clustered Bellflower but that has striking violet flowers that are clustered together at the top without flower stalks.

Uniquely identifiable characteristics

Distinguishing Feature : The very wide bowl-shape (almost washing-up-bowl like) shape of the 'bell'.

No relation to : Peach [a plant with similar name].

Grown in gardens, but readily escapes to woods and scrubs. A blue to pale blue shade, azure perhaps. The only bellflower to have such a very wide open bell end in relation to the length of the bell, and a stigma that splits into three for over 2/3rds of its length.

Like many Bellflowers it is said to ooze a sticky white liquid from broken stems, but it is not toxic, and may even be edible. One source says this milky sap contains the diabetic 'sugar' Inulin which certainly is edible. Many other sources claim that most bellflowers have a sticky milky sap, but none say which Bellflowers do not!

VIOLDELPHIN


Violdelphin is the anthocyanin that colours the blue flowers from the Campanula genus. It consists of an Anthocyanidin (Delphinidin) shown in blue, two para-HydroxyBenzoyl (4-HydroxyBenzoyl, derived from 4-HydrozyBenzoic Acid) moieties (shown in green) and four sugar units shown in red comprising three glucosyl units and one rhamnosyl unit. Compare this with Malonylawobanin anthocyanin found in Bluebells. The p-hydroxybenzoyl and sugar unit comprise a chromone which influences the light absorption spectrum and hence perceived colour. (In Malonylawobanin p-Hydroxybenzoyl moieties are absent, replaced instead by a Coumaryl unit).

Violdelphin is also found in the blue flowers of Delphinium hybridum, a horticultural plant or Canterbury-bells (Campanula medium).


  Campanula persicifolia  ⇐ Global Aspect ⇒ Campanulaceae  

Distribution
 family8Bellflower family8Campanulaceae

 BSBI maps
genus8Campanula
Campanula
(Bellflowers)

PEACH-LEAVED BELLFLOWER

Campanula persicifolia

Bellflower Family [Campanulaceae]

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