RAMPION BELLFLOWER

Campanula rapunculus

Bellflower Family [Campanulaceae]

month8jul month8july month8aug month8sep month8sept

status
statusZarchaeophyte
flower
flower8azure
flower
flower8lilac
inner
inner8white
morph
morph8actino
petals
petalsZ5
type
typeZspiked
stem
stem8round
stem
stem8milkysap stem8milkylatex

4th Sept 2004, Photo: © Bastiaan Brak
An introduced and naturalised (not native) species which is very scattered over the UK and decreasing. It would have gained at the least an [RR] rating for rarity from Prof. Clive Stace had it been native. A rather lax-flowered plant on thin stems but growing to 80cm.


4th Sept 2004, Photo: © Bastiaan Brak
Most books say it is pale blue, but these specimens are pale lilac.


4th Sept 2004, Photo: © Bastiaan Brak
Corolla rather small for a Bellflower at only 10-22mm across. The corolla is lobed just ~1/1 rd of the way to the base. Unopened flower-buds long and narrow.


4th Sept 2004, Photo: © Bastiaan Brak
The calyx teeth are long and very narrow.


4th Sept 2004, Photo: © Bastiaan Brak


4th Sept 2004, Photo: © Bastiaan Brak


4th Sept 2004, Photo: © Bastiaan Brak
There are no distinguishing features in the style, stigmas or anthers that can be used to differentiate between Bellflower species, Bellflowers are all much the same in those respects.


Not to be semantically confused with : Round-Headed Rampion (Phyteuma orbiculare), Oxford Rampion (Phyteuma scheuchzeri) or Spiked Rampion (Phytolacca acinosa) [which although are in the same Campanulaceae family, are in a differing genus]

This plant was once grown in cottage gardens for its leaves and turnip-like roots which were eaten as a salad. It is also now only rarely grown as an ornamental. It is rare and decreasing, to be found naturalised in just a scattering of fields, rough grass and banks mainly south of the latitude of the Wash.

Like many Bellflowers it is said to ooze a sticky white liquid from broken stems, but it is not toxic, and may even be edible. One source says this milky sap contains the diabetic 'sugar' Inulin which certainly is edible. Many other sources claim that most bellflowers have a sticky milky sap, but none say which Bellflowers do not!


  Campanula rapunculus  ⇐ Global Aspect ⇒ Campanulaceae  

Distribution
 family8Bellflower family8Campanulaceae

 BSBI maps
genus8Campanula
Campanula
(Bellflowers)

RAMPION BELLFLOWER

Campanula rapunculus

Bellflower Family [Campanulaceae]