categoryZFerns Ferns List 

RIGID BUCKLER-FERN

LIMESTONE BUCKLER-FERN

Dryopteris submontana

Buckler-Fern Family [Dryopteridaceae]

Fronds:
month8may month8jun month8june month8jul month8july month8aug month8sep month8sept month8oct month8nov

Spores:
spores8jul spores8july spores8aug spores8sep spores8sept

category
category8Ferns
 
status
statusZnative
 
stem
stem8round
 
stem
stem8fluted
 
smell
smell8balsam
balsam
toxicity
toxicityZmedium
 
rarity
rarityZscarce
 

10th June 2015, Lathkill Dale, White Peaks. Photo: © RWD
A [RR] rare plant which grows only on limestone rocks in crevices, grykes and on limestone scree. It is very rare in Derbyshire, but frequently occurs in the North West of England. A stream trickles out of this limestone cave when there has been substantial rain.

The overall shape of the blade is one which is narrowly ovate to lanceolate-triangular, with the lowest pinnae being the longest.



10th June 2015, Lathkill Dale, White Peaks. Photo: © RWD
The fronds grow up to 75cm long including the length of the petiole (stalk) which is over half as long as the blade (the leafy part).


10th June 2015, Lathkill Dale, White Peaks. Photo: © RWD
The blades are 2-pinnate with lobed pinnules.


10th June 2015, Lathkill Dale, White Peaks. Photo: © RWD
There is a groove on the top half of the stalks (rounded on bottom half), but many ferns have this feature.


10th June 2015, Lathkill Dale, White Peaks. Photo: © RWD
The individual pinnules are lobed to between 1/3 rd and 3/4 of the way to the midrib. The frond is dull-green and mealy because it has many glands on both sides of the fronds.


10th June 2015, Lathkill Dale, White Peaks. Photo: © RWD
The sori are roundish and in two rows, one row each side of the midrib, and avoiding the periphery of of the pinnules.


10th June 2015, Lathkill Dale, White Peaks. Photo: © RWD
Here the sori have opened and show their coarsely-grainy structure. The tiny glands covering both upper and lower surface making it appear matte can here just be discerned on the lower surface.


10th June 2015, Lathkill Dale, White Peaks. Photo: © RWD
The two rows of sori on each side of the midrib; some specimens manage to squeeze another shorter row in where there is room (where the leaflet widens nearer the rachis). Note the pattern of the dark-green veins.


See captions for details.

When the leaves are crushed it is said to smell of Balsam.

This is one of the 7 Buckler-ferns which are all in the Dryopteris genus. One of these, Scaly Buckler-fern (Dryopteris remota) is now thought extinct in the British Isles. The rarest is Crested Buckler-fern (Dryopteris cristata) is [RRR] very rare and decreasing in population.

The petiole has rather sparse pale-brown scales, denser nearer the junction with the main stem (there are none to be seen in the above photos).


  Dryopteris submontana  ⇐ Global Aspect ⇒ Dryopteridaceae  

Distribution
 family8Buckler-Fern family8Dryopteridaceae
 BSBI maps
genus8Dryopteris
Dryopteris
(Buckler-Ferns)

RIGID BUCKLER-FERN

LIMESTONE BUCKLER-FERN

Dryopteris submontana

Buckler-Fern Family [Dryopteridaceae]