Burnet (Great) - Wild Flower Finder

GREAT BURNET

Sanguisorba officinalis

Rose Family [Rosaceae]  

month8jun month8june month8jul month8july month8Aug month8sep month8sept

status
statusZnative
flower
flower8red
morph
morph8actino
petals
petalsZ4
stem
stem8round

13th Aug 2007, Kiveton Bridge, South Yorkshire. Photo: © RWD
Tall and spindley, about 30 inches high.


30th July 2007, Near Marsden, West Yorkshire. Photo: © RWD
Dark brown/red flower heads atop branched stems.


7th Aug 2001, Dalegarth, Eskdale Valley, Cumbria. Photo: © RWD
The stem leaves are few.


9th Sept 2006, Newlands Valley, Cumbria. Photo: © RWD


6th July 2007, Little Langdale Valley, Cumbria Photo: © RWD
Floers not ready to open as yet. Each one has a pointed brown bract below it.


6th July 2007, Little Langdale Valley, Cumbria Photo: © RWD
The four petals open revealing four dark-purple stamens within. Stems fluted, sometimes square.


5th Aug 2011, Little Langdale, Cumbria. Photo: © RWD
All the flowers open.


5th Aug 2011, Little Langdale, Cumbria. Photo: © RWD
In the centre is a single paler red stigma.


6th July 2007, Little Langdale Valley, Cumbria Photo: © RWD
The leaves are pinnate, with pronounced forwardly-directed triangular teeth.


24th Aug 2006, Dunsop Bridge, Forest of Bowland. Photo: © RWD
Leaves typical of Rose Family members.


Distinguishing Feature : The flowers are all clustered together in a hard deep-red or nearly brown prolate spherical head. The leaves are typical rose-type, but but much narrower and slightly longer than typical members of the rose family. Like the rose family, the leaves are conspicuously coarsely toothed.

Unlike most members of the rose family, Great Burnet has only four petals, not five. The flowers are all clustered together in a hard deep-red or nearly brown prolate spherical head.


  Sanguisorba officinalis  ⇐ Global Aspect ⇒ Rosaceae  

Distribution
family8rose family8rosaceae

 BSBI maps
genus8sanguisorba
Sanguisorba
(Burnets)

GREAT BURNET

Sanguisorba officinalis

Rose Family [Rosaceae]  

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