PALE CORYDALIS

Pseudofumaria alba

(Formerly: Corydalis ochroleuca)
Poppy Family [Papaveraceae]

month8may month8jun month8june month8jul month8july month8aug month8sep month8sept

category
category8Evergreen
status
statusZneophyte
flower
flower8bicolour
morph
morph8zygo
petals
petalsZ2
type
typeZtubular
type
typeZspurred
stem
stem8round

18th June 2016, a garden, Freshfield, Sefton Coast. Photo: © RWD
Somewhat similar to Climbing Corydalis, but it doesn't climb, has much larger flowers which are yellowish green near the end.


18th June 2016, a garden, Freshfield, Sefton Coast. Photo: © RWD
It is a non-native which occasionally escapes from gardens. This specimen has yet to make a break for it... It has an upright stance, rather than floppy and sprawling like Climbing Corydalis.


18th June 2016, a garden, Freshfield, Sefton Coast. Photo: © RWD
It has a short flowering spike at the summit, and fawn stems somewhat similar in colour to those of Dandelion (except that these branch). The flowers are similar also to those of Fumitorys, to which it is related.


18th June 2016, a garden, Freshfield, Sefton Coast. Photo: © RWD
The flowers have a long narrow tube, which is bent near the summit - the (rather short) nectar tube (spur) at the rear.


18th June 2016, a garden, Freshfield, Sefton Coast. Photo: © RWD
The two petals are diametrically opposite each other, membranous, and slightly wider and curled.


18th June 2016, a garden, Freshfield, Sefton Coast. Photo: © RWD
The inner part of the flower is shorter than the petals and yellowish-green at the tip. the flower stalks (petioles) flex under the weight of the flower (when both it and the following fruit have vacated the petiole straightens up.


18th June 2016, a garden, Freshfield, Sefton Coast. Photo: © RWD
Most of the flowers on this part have dropped off whilst the flat, ship-shaped (pale-green) fruit/seed pods develop.


18th June 2016, a garden, Freshfield, Sefton Coast. Photo: © RWD
The stigma sticks out of the mouth. There are two short green flaps under each flower.


18th June 2016, a garden, Freshfield, Sefton Coast. Photo: © RWD
Aphids on a drooping petiole now supporting the fruit/seed pod. The slight lumpiness of this one suggests about 4 seeds are developing within.


18th June 2016, a garden, Freshfield, Sefton Coast. Photo: © RWD
After the pods have also dropped off the petioles straighten up (top part).


18th June 2016, a garden, Freshfield, Sefton Coast. Photo: © RWD
Leaves irregularly lobed with 2 - 4 or more lobes and are reminiscent of those leaves of some Meadow-rues such as Lesser Meadow-Rue or to Maidenhair Fern.


18th June 2016, a garden, Freshfield, Sefton Coast. Photo: © RWD
Leaves are grey-green and quite thick as are the pale fawn stems and both look as though they are succulent. The short bi-pinnate nature of the leaflets.


18th June 2016, a garden, Freshfield, Sefton Coast. Photo: © RWD
The leaves are in opposite pairs and one could almost suggest they were pinnate, but with very few leaflets. Note the purple-tipped hydathodes at the tips of the lobes.


Not to be semantically confused with : the Coriolis force [a perceived force in Physics when a body is rotating]

Uniquely identifiable characteristics

Distinguishing Feature :

It is a non-native short-lived perennial plant which is planted in gardens. It is not a commonly planted plant and is a slow-grower preferring dappled shade and a moist soil. The leaves often remain through winter. It has a semi-succulent appearance. The flowers are borne in racemes on short petioles. The plant is branched.


  Pseudofumaria alba  ⇐ Global Aspect ⇒ Papaveraceae  

Distribution
 family8Poppy family8Papaveraceae

 BSBI maps
genus8Pseudofumaria
Pseudofumaria
(Corydalises)

PALE CORYDALIS

Pseudofumaria alba

(Formerly: Corydalis ochroleuca)
Poppy Family [Papaveraceae]