ROUND-LEAVED CRANE'S-BILL

Geranium rotundifolium

Crane's-bill (Geranium) Family [Geraniaceae]

month8apr month8april month8may month8jun month8june month8jul month8july month8aug

status
statusZnative
flower
flower8pink
flower
flower8cream
flower
flower8indigo
morph
morph8actino
petals
petalsZ5
stem
stem8round
sex
sexZbisexual



26th June 2019, hillock, Great Orme, Llandudno, North Wales. Photo: © RWD
The leaves are no more 'rounded' than they are on some other Crane's-bills, so maybe it is the leaf teeth that are more 'rounded' than most others(?). Moreover, often the leaves, in outline, are only semi-circular (half-round!). More distinctive are 3 short bluntish teeth (the outer just a fraction shorter than the central) of each lobe - the lobes themselves being cut to no greater than half way to the stem. There are between 5 and 9 lobes, of more or less equal length.


26th June 2019, hillock, Great Orme, Llandudno, North Wales. Photo: © RWD
The flowers are small with petals between 5 and 7mm long (the smallest-flowered Crane's-bill is Cut-Leaved Crane's-bill with petals 4.5 to 6mm long). Long-Stalked Crane's-bill has slightly larger petals than either of these at 7 to 10mm long.

[Just below right are the tiny white flowers of Knotted Hedge-Parsley, and below those near the edge are the tiny burred fruits].



26th June 2019, hillock, Great Orme, Llandudno, North Wales. Photo: © RWD
These leaves are disobeying the minimum 5 lobes specification... They have but 3 lobes.


26th June 2019, hillock, Great Orme, Llandudno, North Wales. Photo: © RWD
The petals are either not notched at the end, or with only a very slight indentation. Glandular hairs are present on most of the plant, here on the flower and leaf stalks and on the sepals and fruiting 'needles' (to centre), which still has a (red) style attached.


26th June 2019, hillock, Great Orme, Llandudno, North Wales. Photo: © RWD
The fruiting 'needles' have now turned black, and have 5 black egg-shaped seed cases attached via 5 long springs to the tip of the 'needle' (actually called a column). When ripe, the springs (actually called 'beaks') are released and catapult the multiple seeds within each some considerable distance in order to start new plants. The sepals (now reddened towards their tips) are still there, at the bottom.


30th May 2009, unknown place, 36 Photo: © Bastiaan Brak
The mericarps are now empty the seeds having been flung widely in 5 directions by 5 now curled-up beaks. The 5 curled up beaks now reveal the greenish centre parts of the column at the very tip of which are the stigmas (now blackish). The sepals (now reddened towards their tips) are still there, at the bottom.


30th May 2009, unknown place, 36 Photo: © Bastiaan Brak
The 5 mericarps at the end of their curled-up beaks are now seen as oval(ish) 'canoes' once full of seeds. Almost everything is hairy!


26th June 2019, hillock, Great Orme, Llandudno, North Wales. Photo: © RWD
Many of the hairs (in various places) have glands at their tips; the glands are usually red, as here. Leaf stems are usually red. [A grass leaf strikes through the centre of the photo]


26th June 2019, hillock, Great Orme, Llandudno, North Wales. Photo: © RWD
Red-stalked glands on the petiole leading up to the flowerhead. Petal colour is usually reddish-pink. [A grass leaf strikes through the centre of the photo]


30th May 2009, unknown place Photo: © Bastiaan Brak
A flower against the light.


22nd April 2007, unknown place Photo: © Bastiaan Brak
At last a round leaf!


22nd April 2007, unknown place, Photo: © Bastiaan Brak
Red stems everywhere here. The leaf has red edges from where very short red hairs emanate.


22nd April 2007, unknown place Photo: © Bastiaan Brak
The darker-pink stigma is in the centre surrounded by slightly shorter white filaments with white anthers.


22nd April 2007, unknown place Photo: © Bastiaan Brak
The pinkish stigma in the centre; anthers not to be seen unless this time they are also pink and surround the pink stigma (?).


22nd April 2007, unknown place Photo: © Bastiaan Brak
The 5 sepals are oval shaped with a short thick bristle at their tips. Sepals covered in hairs with red glandular tips.


Not to be semantically confused with : Round-leaved Cotoneaster (Cotoneaster hissaricus), Round-Leaved Sundew (Drosera rotundifolia), Round-leaved St John's-wort (Hypericum nummularium), Round-Leaved Fluellen (Kickxia spuria), Round-leaved Vetchling (Lathyrus rotundifolius), Round-Leaved Mint (Mentha suaveolens), Round-Leaved Wintergreen (Pyrola rotundifolia), Round-leaved Crowfoot (Ranunculus omiophyllus), Round-leaved Dog-rose (Rosa obtusifolia), Round-leaved Saxifrage (Saxifraga rotundifolia), Round-leaved Whitebeam (Sorbus eminens) [plants with similar names from differing genera]

Easily mistaken for : two other Crane's-bills with small flowers:

  • Long-Stalked Crane's-bill has slightly larger petals at 7 to 10mm long
  • Cut-Leaved Crane's-bill with slightly shorter petals 4.5 to 6mm long which are deeply notched (to less than halfway)
  • But both of the above have leaves that are deeply lobed with nearly linear lobes and lack any red-glandular hairs.

Uniquely identifiable characteristics

Distinguishing Feature : The small un-notched and reddish-pink petals (sometimes may be slightly concave at end) and the glandular hairs with red glands (particularly on reddened parts of the plant).


  Geranium rotundifolium  ⇐ Global Aspect ⇒ Geraniaceae  

Distribution
 family8Cranesbill (Geranium) family8Geraniaceae
 BSBI maps
genus8Geranium
Geranium
(Crane's-bills)

ROUND-LEAVED CRANE'S-BILL

Geranium rotundifolium

Crane's-bill (Geranium) Family [Geraniaceae]