SMALL-FLOWERED CRANE'S-BILL

Geranium pusillum

Crane's-bill (Geranium) Family [Geraniaceae]  

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status
statusZnative
flower
flower8pink
flower
flower8lilac
inner
inner8lilac
morph
morph8actino
petals
petalsZ5
stem
stem8round

26th June 2019, flanks of Great Orme, Llandudno, North Wales. Photo: © RWD
Bird's eye view of it sprawling over the ground amidst grass and other plants. The flowers are small for a Crane's-bill, with petals just 2 to 4mm long (smaller than the very similar Dove's-foot Crane's-bill which has petals 3 to 6mm long).


26th June 2019, flanks of Great Orme, Llandudno, North Wales. Photo: © RWD


26th June 2019, flanks of Great Orme, Llandudno, North Wales. Photo: © RWD
The non-glandular hairs on the stem are uniformly short (it may, or may not also possess glandular hairs) (unlike the very similar Dove's-foot Crane's-bill which has a mix of both short and long non-glandular hairs and short glandular hairs).


26th June 2019, flanks of Great Orme, Llandudno, North Wales. Photo: © RWD
The flowers are a duller and paler pink than those of the similar Dove's-foot Crane's-bill.


26th June 2019, flanks of Great Orme, Llandudno, North Wales. Photo: © RWD
Only 5 of the 10 stamens have anthers (here they are purple-blue). The 5 pale pink things between them are the stigmas of a single style. The petals have a deep indentation at the extremity (like an Ace of Hearts shape) but so too does Dove's-foot Crane's-bill.


17th May 2009, unknown place. Photo: © Bastiaan Brak
Sprawling near the ground or reaching higher up. The leaves have between 7 and 9 main lobes which are cut between 2/3 rds to 1/2 way to the base.


17th May 2009, unknown place. Photo: © Bastiaan Brak


17th May 2009, unknown place. Photo: © Bastiaan Brak


17th May 2009, unknown place. Photo: © Bastiaan Brak
Petals between 2.5mm and 4mm long and mauve-pinkish. The 5 stigmas in the centre are more pinkish.


17th May 2009, unknown place. Photo: © Bastiaan Brak
Petals with a distinct 'claw' (a tapering narrow part of the petal where it attaches) and are less than half as long as the 'limb'. The ends of the petals have a shallow curved notch. There 10 stamens in the flowers in two concentric circles; the outer circle of 5 never have anthers.

The seed-containing fruit (column) is fairly long and may be smooth or with tiny hairs as this specimen shows. The hairs on the mericarps here are glandular having tiny bobbles at their ends. The still hidden seeds (contained within) are smooth. The 5 stigmas still top the column. The mericarp has not yet sprung and curled outwards.



17th May 2009, unknown place. Photo: © Bastiaan Brak
The sepals from which the columns emerge have long hairs.


17th May 2009, unknown place. Photo: © Bastiaan Brak
Leaves cut to more than half-way.


Easily confused with : other small-flowered Geranium (Crane's-bill) species especially with Dove's-foot Crane's-bill (Geranium molle) but Small-flowered Crane's-bill is smaller-flowered than that; with paler and dingy-lilac petals; with the outer 5 stamens being without anthers; the leaves are cut to over half-way and the fruits are not ridged with short soft-downy hairs.

No relation to : Small-Flowered Evening-Primrose (Oenothera cambrica), Small-flowered Opium Poppy (Papaver somniferum ssp. setigerum), Small-flowered Phacelia (Phacelia parviflora), Small-Flowered Buttercup (Ranunculus parviflorus), Small-flowered Sweet-briar (Rosa micrantha), Small-flowered Tongue-orchid (Serapias parviflora), Small-flowered Catchfly (Silene gallica) nor with Small-flowered Winter-cress (Barbarea stricta) [unrelated plants with similar names]

It is a native plant to be found in bare ground or waste land amongst grass.


  Geranium pusillum  ⇐ Global Aspect ⇒ Geraniaceae  

Distribution
family8Cranesbill family8Geranium family8Geraniaceae
 BSBI maps
genus8geranium
Geranium
(Crane's-bills)

SMALL-FLOWERED CRANE'S-BILL

Geranium pusillum

Crane's-bill (Geranium) Family [Geraniaceae]  

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