categoryZClimbers Climbers List 

CRIMSON-GLORY-VINE

Vitis coignetiae

Vine Family [Vitaceae]

month8jul month8july month8aug month8sep month8sept month8oct month8nov

Berries: berryZpossible      berryZcream berryZyellow berryZbluish berryZblack  (12mmφ, non-toxic, barely edible)
berry8sep berry8sept berry8oct berry8nov berry8dec

category
category8Climbers
status
statusZalien
flower
flower8green
morph
morph8actino
petals
petalsZ5
stem
stem8round
stem
stem8ribbed
stem
stem8hollow

30th May 2015, garden wall, Monyash, White Peaks. Photo: © RWD
It is a vine, a climber which scrambles up walls by means of tendril to help it maintain a grip.


30th May 2015, garden wall, Monyash, White Peaks. Photo: © RWD
The leaves are a variety of shades of bright-green and reddish-lime this time of year, but later on they turn a vivid scarlet colour.


30th May 2015, garden wall, Monyash, White Peaks. Photo: © RWD
The stems are hollow, as seen on the stems which have been purposely trimmed with garden shears. They are also woody at the ground ends.


30th May 2015, garden wall, Monyash, White Peaks. Photo: © RWD
In the centre and slightly above are some really small bunches of tiny green or reddish spheres. These could be the flowers, but it is more likely that they are the beginnings of the bunches of the much larger blackish berries which when ripe are about 12mm in diameter. [For them to be flowers, you would expect to be able to see the tiny 5 petals]. Flowers turn to fruit.


30th May 2015, garden wall, Monyash, White Peaks. Photo: © RWD
Some more bunches of even small fruits.


30th May 2015, garden wall, Monyash, White Peaks. Photo: © RWD
Both stems and tendrils exposed to the sun a lot turn a bright red. The tendrills here are branched several times and looking for something upon which to wind around for purchase upon.


30th May 2015, garden wall, Monyash, White Peaks. Photo: © RWD
Tendrils twisting around to obtain purchase. Stems, tendrils and leaf veins red.


30th May 2015, garden wall, Monyash, White Peaks. Photo: © RWD
A tendril has gained purchase on one of the plants own stems, pulling itself up by its own boot-laces :-) In electronic engineering this approach is called 'boot-strapping' and it's a wonder it works at all.


30th May 2015, garden wall, Monyash, White Peaks. Photo: © RWD
Leaves with red veins. Tendrils at top looking for something.


30th May 2015, garden wall, Monyash, White Peaks. Photo: © RWD
The leaves are markedly veined. The main five veins radiate out in curves from the leaf-stem junction, with secondary veins branching off at 30° from them. Between secondary veins are a network of much smaller veins making the leaf surface very lumpy. Even woody stems have branches which bear new leaves.


30th May 2015, garden wall, Monyash, White Peaks. Photo: © RWD
Stems round or slightly ribbed.


30th May 2015, garden wall, Monyash, White Peaks. Photo: © RWD
Most leaves are cardioid-shaped (Ace-of-Spades). They have bluntly-rounded (some have pointed tipped teeth) triangular teeth. Larger leaves also have discontinuities in the outline, like this one where it suddenly shortens near the end.


30th May 2015, garden wall, Monyash, White Peaks. Photo: © RWD
Blunt teeth. Lumpy leaf surface. The topmost leaf on its way to becoming scarlet red in another month or two.


30th May 2015, garden wall, Monyash, White Peaks. Photo: © RWD
Stems shortly hairs, ribbed in places. Bright red if in the sun and it hasn't yet turned woody. Leaf at the top and bottom have pointed teeth (rather than blunt).


No relation to : Chilean Glory-flower (Eccremocarpus scaber), Common Morning-glory (Ipomoea hederacea), Glory-of-the-Snow (Scilla forbesii) [plants with similar names belonging to differing families].

Not to be semantically confused with : Chocolate Vine (Akebia trifoliata) , Madeira-vine (Anredera cordifolia) , Staff-vine (Celastrus orbiculatus) , Russian Vine (Fallopia baldschuanica) , Chilean potato vine (Solanum crispum) , [plants with similar names belonging to differing families].

Many similarities to : Grape-vine (Vitis vinifera) to which it is directly related, being within the same genus.

Uniquely identifiable characteristics

Distinguishing Feature :

A very vigorous ornamental grape which can climb up to 20m on walls and other vertical surfaces. It has non-poisonous but barely edible blackish-blue berries. This fruit is about 12mm in diameter and is a blackish-blue with a matte whitish sheen which rubs off. The spectacular heart-shaped leaves turn stunning shades of gold, orange and then crimson in Autumn and are remarkably up to 30cm long.

The tiny inconspicuous flowers appear in summer, have 5 petals and are green.

STILBENOIDS


ε-Viniferin is a Stilbenoid and a dimer of Resveratrol, a polyphenol, although that is not immediately apparent from the layout of the two Resveratrol moieties, so your Author has thoughtfully coloured the two Resveratrols red and cyan. The two black lines are just molecular bonds connecting the two Resveratrols, they are not extra atoms, although ε-Viniferin has lost two hydrogen atoms from the two combined Resveratrols. The observant amongst the readers will notice that a Furan ring has formed as part of the dimer which is common to both Resveratrol moieties. Resveratrol is not listed as one of the compounds present in this plant, but it is a fairly common secondary metabolite.

ε-Viniferin is also found in in other vines, such as Grape-Vine (Vitis vinifera) Crimson and in the bark of the non-native Camphor Tree (Dryobalanops aromatica) which also accommodates the C-glycoside of ε-Viniferin called DiptoIndonesin A.




Rhapontigenin, also found in Crimson-Glory-Vine and in a liana from South East Yunan, is the methoxy version of Resveratrol. It exhibits anti-cancerous properties against prostrate Cancer by inhibiting Cytochrome P450 1A1, and enzyme present in the human body.



  Vitis coignetiae  ⇐ Global Aspect ⇒ Vitaceae  

Distribution
 family8Vine family8Vitaceae

 BSBI maps
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Vitis
(Grape-Vine)

CRIMSON-GLORY-VINE

Vitis coignetiae

Vine Family [Vitaceae]