OXEYE DAISY

MOON DAISY

Leucanthemum vulgare

Daisy & Dandelion Family [Asteraceae]

month8may month8jun month8june month8jul month8july month8aug month8sep month8sept

status
statusZnative
flower
flower8white
inner
inner8yellow
morph
morph8actino
petals
petalsZMany
stem
stem8square
stem
stem8round

11th June 2014, Hope Railway Station, Derbyshire. Photo: © RWD
The UK's largest native Daisy growing to 75cm. Spreads in grassy places.


11th June 2014, Hope Railway Station, Derbyshire. Photo: © RWD
Waiting for the train on Hope station. A single flower atop an un-branched stem. Leaves alternate up the stem. Another weed on its left.


28th Sept 2008, sea wall, Foxfield, Cumbria/Lancs. Photo: © RWD
Lower leaves on long flattened stalks, the upper clasp the stem.


28th Sept 2008, sea wall, Foxfield, Cumbria/Lancs. Photo: © RWD
Large white daisy-like flowers 25mm - 60mm across with yellow disc-florets in the centre.


15th July 2014, Hope Railway Station, Derbyshire. Photo: © RWD
White ray-florets rounded at the end. A domed set of yellow disc-florets in centre.


15th July 2014, Hope Railway Station, Derbyshire. Photo: © RWD
Most disc-florets, apart from a few in the centre, have not yet opened here.


15th July 2014, Hope Railway Station, Derbyshire. Photo: © RWD
Sepal bracts similar to those of Mayweeds, such as Sea Mayweed but in this case are monotonically tapering margins rather than undulating and linear.


15th July 2014, Hope Railway Station, Derbyshire. Photo: © RWD
Sepal bracts are brown-edged and over-lap each other in 4 or 5 sets, the lowest-most considerably shorter than those touching the white ray-florets.


15th July 2014, Hope Railway Station, Derbyshire. Photo: © RWD
The stem can variously be round, slightly angular (as here) or square.


7th May 2015, canal loops, Newton, Leeds & L/pool Canal, nr Skipton. Photo: © RWD
The leaves are very variable, but there are two main types, basal leaves near the foot and those on the upper stem.


7th May 2015, canal loops, Newton, Leeds & L/pool Canal, nr Skipton. Photo: © RWD
The upper leaves are long, spoon-shaped with a winged stem, roundly-toothed and clasp the stem and have none or several auricles.


7th May 2015, canal loops, Newton, Leeds & L/pool Canal, nr Skipton. Photo: © RWD


7th May 2015, canal loops, Newton, Leeds & L/pool Canal, nr Skipton. Photo: © RWD
The basal leaves are longer, table-tennis bat-shaped with little or no wings on the much longer stalk and lack auricles.


10th May 2015, viaduct over river, Bury, Lancs. Photo: © RWD
Stem leaves clasping a square-section stem on two sides, with several auricles sticking out near the stem.


11th June 2014, Hope Railway Station, Derbyshire. Photo: © RWD
Stem leaves alternate. Here stem leaves sharply toothed, but then, the book does say that the leaves are variable... The Author thinks the above photo still represents Oxeye Daisy rather than Autumn Oxeye (Leucanthemella serotina) which also has sharply toothed leaves, but according to Mr Clive Stace they lack the auricles as displayed here.


10th May 2015, viaduct over river, Bury, Lancs. Photo: © RWD
Several auricles on this stem leaf. Stems hairy and square (or round).


Not to be semantically confused with : Yellow Oxeye (Telekia speciosa) [a plant with similar name belonging to the same Dandelion & Daisy family but with very large bright-yellow but narrow ray-florets with very large cordate to lanceolate leaves]

Easily mis-identified as : Shasta Daisy (Leucanthemum × superbum) but that is taller at 1.2m high (up to 1.5m max) has larger flowers 60mm-100mm across, larger and sharply-pointed teeth on the leaves and no auricles. The leaves also have a linear taper to their attachment point on the stem.

Many similarities to : Autumn Oxeye (Leucanthemella uliginosum) which also resembles Shasta Daisy but the leaves lack the characteristic smell of that and are a paler green, are thinner and possess more sharply-pointed and deeply-serrated teeth. Autumn Oxeye is also almost unknown in the wild in the UK now, and, at up to 2m tall, is much taller than either Oxeye Daisy or Shasta Daisy.

Oxeye Daisy is a native clump-forming perennial plant with rhizomes. It grows in grassy places on rich soils throughout the UK. It is very variable in characteristics, being diploid in meadows but tetraploids are common. Much planting from unknown sources has occurred alongside roadside verges.


  Leucanthemum vulgare  ⇐ Global Aspect ⇒ Asteraceae  

Distribution
 family8Daisy & Dandelion family8Asteraceae

 BSBI maps
genus8Leucanthemum
Leucanthemum
(Oxeye Daisies)

OXEYE DAISY

MOON DAISY

Leucanthemum vulgare

Daisy & Dandelion Family [Asteraceae]