categoryZUnderShrubs UnderShrubs List 
categoryZDeciduous Deciduous List 
categoryZBrooadleaf Broadleaf List 

DEWBERRY

Rubus caesius

Rose Family [Rosaceae]  

Flowers:
month8May month8jun month8june month8jul month8july month8Aug month8sep month8sept

Berries: berryZpossible        berryZgreen berryZbluish  (edible, in small groups)
berry8sep berry8sept berry8oct berry8nov berry8dec

category
category8UnderShrubs
 
category
category8Deciduous
 
category
category8Broadleaf
 
status
statusZnative
 
flower
flower8white
 
morph
morph8actino
 
petals
petalsZ5
 
stem
stem8round
 
stem
stem8spines stem8thorns
spines

5th Aug 2008, in the woods on Ainsdale Sand Dunes, Merseyside. Photo: © RWD
Low and sprawling. On sand at the edge of woodland.


5th Aug 2008, in the woods on Ainsdale Sand Dunes, Merseyside. Photo: © RWD
An isolated plant, quite rare!


25th Sept 2008, Trowbridge Quarry, Silverdale, Lancs. Photo: © RWD


5th Aug 2008, in the woods on Ainsdale Sand Dunes, Merseyside. Photo: © RWD


5th Aug 2008, in the woods on Ainsdale Sand Dunes, Merseyside. Photo: © RWD


25th Sept 2008, Trowbridge Quarry, Silverdale, Lancs. Photo: © RWD
The berries have a matt-blue-black bloom on them.


25th Sept 2008, Trowbridge Quarry, Silverdale, Lancs. Photo: © RWD
The stems have weaker stems and thorns than Blackberries.


25th Sept 2008, Trowbridge Quarry, Silverdale, Lancs. Photo: © RWD
the berries are quite distinct from Blackberries.


Hybridizes with : Bramble(s).

Lookee-Likees : Brambles.

Uniquely identifiable characteristics : The bluish-black multiple fruits have distinctly larger fruitlets than do the berries of Blackberry, and there are fewer of them in the fruit. The difference is very noticeable.

Dewberry is a low, sprawling prostate undershrub closely related to the Brambles with which it readily hybridizes. It inhabits sandy places, like sand dunes, especially at woodland edges. It also grows in grassy places, fens and scrubland.

The berries are about as large as a blackberry, but the fruitlets are notably larger than those in blackberries and fewer in number. They also usually have a matt-bluish bloom on them, which readily thumbs off with fingering. Although the dark-bluish black fruits are edible, they are rather insipid.

The stems have smaller briars on than do brambles, and they are also thinner and less robust. The leaves are trefoil, as in most brambles. The flowers are white with five petals.


  Rubus caesius  ⇐ Global Aspect ⇒ Rosaceae  

Distribution
family8rose family8rosaceae

 BSBI maps
genus8rubus
Rubus
(Brambles)

DEWBERRY

Rubus caesius

Rose Family [Rosaceae]  

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