categoryZShrubs Shrubs List 
categoryZBroadleaf Broadleaf List 
categoryZDeciduous Deciduous List 

HIMALAYAN GIANT

Rubus armeniacus

(Formerly: Rubus procerus)
Rose Family [Rosaceae]

month8may month8jun month8june month8jul month8july month8aug month8sep month8sept month8oct month8nov

Berries: berryZpossible      berryZgreen berryZgreenred berryZblack  (edible, 'blackberry', aggregate fruit)
berry8jul berry8july berry8aug berry8sep berry8sept berry8oct

category
category8Shrubs
 
category
category8Broadleaf
 
category
category8Deciduous
 
status
statusZneophyte
 
flower
flower8lilac
 
inner
inner8white
 
morph
morph8actino
 
petals
petalsZ5
 
stem
stem8round
 
stem
stem8spines stem8thorns
prickles
contact
contactZmedium
 
sex
sexZbisexual
 

30th Aug 2014, Liverpool Loop Lines, Merseyside. Photo: © RWD
Himalayan Giant, a bramble, is not from the Himalayas, but has arrived from Germany (says one source, another source says from Europe, but the newer binomial name Rubus armeniacus might suggest it came from Armenia) [possibly via Germany?].


30th Aug 2014, Liverpool Loop Lines, Merseyside. Photo: © RWD
It is very stout, tall and arching, and long, with side branches which are thinner.


30th Aug 2014, Liverpool Loop Lines, Merseyside. Photo: © RWD
The leaves are smallish for a Bramble and elliptic to obovate in shape.


30th Aug 2014, Liverpool Loop Lines, Merseyside. Photo: © RWD
Although you cannot see them in leaves near the top, the hairs on the under surface are whiteish with matted hairs.


10th Sept 2014, Rimrose Park, Waterloo, Merseyside. Photo: © RWD
Main stem very thick and with long, sharp(!) slightly un-equal prickles. The surface of the stem has a whiteish bloom


12th July 2014, Wigg Island, nr Runcorn, Cheshire. Photo: © RWD
A thinner side-branch with leaves in 5's.


5th July 2014, Rimrose Park, Waterloo, Merseyside. Photo: © RWD
ditto


26th June 2019, flanks of Great Orme, Llandudno, North Wales. Photo: © RWD
The flowers have 5 pale pink petals and numerous stamens forming a half-dome.


26th June 2019, flanks of Great Orme, Llandudno, North Wales. Photo: © RWD
The numerous stamens start with yellow stamens which first turn fawn before turning dark brown.


26th June 2019, flanks of Great Orme, Llandudno, North Wales. Photo: © RWD
Some flowers have shed their petals, the stamens are withered brown and form an annulus aroun the growing fruit, which is green to begin with.


30th Aug 2014, Liverpool Loop Lines, Merseyside. Photo: © RWD
The fruit starts off small and green, turns red before maturing when black.


30th Aug 2014, Liverpool Loop Lines, Merseyside. Photo: © RWD
The fruit is aggregate; consisting of many druplets and is edible when black.


Not to be semantically confused with : Himalayan Clematis (Clematis montana), Himalayan Crane's-bill (Geranium himalayense), Himalayan Honeysuckle (Leycesteria formosa), Himalayan Bistort (Persicaria affinis), Himalayan Knotweed (Persicaria wallichii), Himalayan Sorbaria (Sorbaria tomentosa), Himalayan Spiraea (Spiraea canescens), Himalayan Balsam (aka Indian Balsam) (Impatiens glandulifera), [a plant with similar name]

Easily mistaken for : many other Brambles (Rubus species)

Hybrids
There are 334 microspecies of Bramble: they hybridise and back-cross with one another. Most Brambles are tetraploid (have 4 sets of chromosomes [normally, humans have but 2]) but there also exist species of Bramble which are triploid, pentaploid, haxaploid and heptaploid. Rubus armeniacus is tetraploid.

However, there exists one exception: Rubus ulmifolius (a plant not shown here and apparently lacking a common name, as many brambles do) is rather special: it is the only diploid (that is, has only 2 sets of chromosomes) and the only wholly sexual microspecies of Bramble.

The black fruit is small on this species. Rubus frruits are an aggregate fruit, containing many drupelets. It is usually called a Blackberry. Blackberries grow on all Brambles, of which there are about 334 differing ones in the UK, but they hybridise between themselves too. All the fruits on Brambles are nominally edible, when ripe, which occurs after they have darkened from red to black. Blackberry pickers would have to be botany specialists if they really wanted to know exactly which of the ~334 bramble species they were actually picking... But it really doesn't matter, although indubitably some are tastier than others, some bigger than others, etc.

It is one of the larger brambles which are proliferating all over the place, transforming good land into impenetrable thickets. It occurs widely in the UK, especially on clay or chalk where fewer other microspecies of Rubus are to be found. Because of these soil preferences it is the commonest microspecies in several locations of the UK and Channel Islands.

Brambles are the curse of walkers, ripping trousers, socks, hands and legs and generally forming an impenetrable barrier to progress, much like the rampant Gorse which invades footpaths and ways.


  Rubus armeniacus  ⇐ Global Aspect ⇒ Rosaceae  

Distribution
 family8Rose family8Rosaceae
 BSBI maps
genus8Rubus
Rubus
(Brambles)

HIMALAYAN GIANT

Rubus armeniacus

(Formerly: Rubus procerus)
Rose Family [Rosaceae]