GOOD-KING-HENRY

GOOD KING HENRY

Chenopodium bonus-henricus

Goosefoot Family [Amaranthaceae]

month8may month8jun month8june month8jul month8july month8aug

status
statusZarchaeophyte
flower
flower8yellow
inner
inner8green
morph
morph8actino
petals
petalsZ5
type
typeZspiked
stem
stem8round
stem
stem8ribbed

3rd June 2016, road, Roehead, Pooley Bridge, Cumbria. Photo: © RWD
Grows up to 50cm tall in bare or grassy places near rural buildings.
[The un-evenly toothed leaves at the bottom to left and right are those of a Dandelion. The tall plant on the left is Garlic Mustard - behind the Good King Henry is an umbellifer]


3rd June 2016, road, Roehead, Pooley Bridge, Cumbria. Photo: © RWD
Lower leaves are isosceles-triangular in shape, wrinkly and wavy-edged and with a prominent basal lobe. Upper leaves rhomboid or more oval, but all with stalks. It is a rhizomatous perennial plant.


3rd June 2016, road, Roehead, Pooley Bridge, Cumbria. Photo: © RWD
There are 7 flower-spikes (actually spikes of spikes, or panicles) visible in this photo.


3rd June 2016, road, Roehead, Pooley Bridge, Cumbria. Photo: © RWD
Flower spikelets densely covered in small (about 5mm across) flowers. This panicle looking fuzzier than the others because the casings have fallen off the anthers and so they appear thinner.


3rd June 2016, road, Roehead, Pooley Bridge, Cumbria. Photo: © RWD
Whereas on this flowering panicle the anthers are still mostly encased in their cream-coloured casings.


3rd June 2016, road, Roehead, Pooley Bridge, Cumbria. Photo: © RWD
Naked anthers - here with dark-brown coloured pollen. Note numerous deep grooves on stems.


3rd June 2016, road, Roehead, Pooley Bridge, Cumbria. Photo: © RWD
The flowers with (mostly) 2-pronged stigmas and stamens with anthers still encased in cream-coloured (reddish in some cases) cases.


3rd June 2016, road, Roehead, Pooley Bridge, Cumbria. Photo: © RWD
Single flowers showing 5 stamens with 5 'double-barrelled' anthers atop. The whitish two-pronged stigma is visible on the lower flower. Stems are covered in small white (transparent) 'blobs' which look like grains of sugar (but are not). Flowers are either bisexual or female. Two green fruits at top with the forked stigmas.


3rd June 2016, road, Roehead, Pooley Bridge, Cumbria. Photo: © RWD
The stigmas on most styles are forked into two like horns of Highland Cattle, but some are like tridents with three spurs.


3rd June 2016, road, Roehead, Pooley Bridge, Cumbria. Photo: © RWD
One flower with 5 green sepals holding 5 stamens with a pair of anther cases which are splitting open to drop off and reveal the fresh cream-coloured pollen grains.


3rd June 2016, road, Roehead, Pooley Bridge, Cumbria. Photo: © RWD
This flowering panicle has gone to (green) fruit each with a forked stigma still atop. The pale-green underside of the leaves are prominently veined. top of leaves are shiny bright-green.


3rd June 2016, road, Roehead, Pooley Bridge, Cumbria. Photo: © RWD
Clustersc of green fruits wielding forked stigmas.


3rd June 2016, road, Roehead, Pooley Bridge, Cumbria. Photo: © RWD
Main stem with ribs/grooves and covered in tiny transparent-white globules.


3rd June 2016, road, Roehead, Pooley Bridge, Cumbria. Photo: © RWD
The leaves.


3rd June 2016, road, Roehead, Pooley Bridge, Cumbria. Photo: © RWD
These leaves are displaying their two side-lobes.


3rd June 2016, road, Roehead, Pooley Bridge, Cumbria. Photo: © RWD
Whilst the lower leaves look reminiscent of those of Lords And Ladies.


Some similarities to : Maple-leaved Goosefoot (Chenopodium hybridum) but that has 3 large, wide but pointed teeth on the leaves and the stems are thinner.

Uniquely identifiable characteristics: An Archaeophyte and the only perennial Goosefoot. The also longer-than-wide vaguely isosceles-triangular mealy leaves which are scarcely lobed and the dense panicle of small flowers usually without leaves within the flower spike.

Distinguishing Feature :

It is a was once used to be cultivated as a vegetable, for the leaves are mealy. It is found near farm buildings, beside roads and pastures in nitrogen-rich areas typical of farms. Scattered locally over most of Britain but rare in North and West Scotland and Ireland.


  Chenopodium bonus-henricus  ⇐ Global Aspect ⇒ Amaranthaceae  

Distribution
 family8Goosefoot family8Amaranthaceae

 BSBI maps
genus8Chenopodium
Chenopodium
(Goosefoots)

GOOD-KING-HENRY

GOOD KING HENRY

Chenopodium bonus-henricus

Goosefoot Family [Amaranthaceae]