HAREBELL

SCOTTISH BLUEBELL

Campanula rotundifolia

Bellflower Family [Campanulaceae]  

month8jul month8july month8Aug month8sep month8sept month8Oct month8Nov

status
statusZnative
 
flower
flower8blue
 
morph
morph8actino
 
petals
petalsZ1
  (5) 
type
typeZbell
 
stem
stem8round
 
stem
stem8milkysap stem8milkylatex
 

15th July 2005, Warton Crag, Lancs. Photo: © RWD
A single pale to mid-blue flower droops atop a thin wiry stalk. Grows on walls, rocks, or grassland. Leaves at the base are rounder than stem leaves, but usually wither before the flowers appear.


15th July 2005, Warton Crag, Lancs. Photo: © RWD
Wiry flowering stems branch off near the top. Stem leaves long and linear, peeling away from the stem at intervals. Colour a pale blue once fully opened (deep blue in un-opened flower).


27th July 2004, Marsden, West Yorkshire. Photo: © RWD
Stems and leaves hardly visible when growing in grass.


27th July 2004, Marsden, West Yorkshire. Photo: © RWD
The flowers are horn-shaped, only flaring nearer the ends where rounded notches give way to five petals.


7th July 2006, flanks of Winder, Sedbergh, Lancs. Photo: © RWD
Each flower has one long central stigma which splits into three near the tip.


3rd July 2010, Hare Parrock quarry, Silverdale, Lancs. Photo: © RWD
An un-ripe flower. The five sepals parallel to the flower.


16th Aug 2010, Hightown, Sefton Coast, Lancs. Photo: © RWD
An un-opened deep-blue flower, deeply fluted until it fully unfolds.


11th July 2005, Cumbria Coastal Way, near Cark. Photo: © RWD
The five sepals at the rear are thin, pointed and angled backwards. The horn only starts flaring outwards after the five pointed petals are resolved into separate entities.


16th Aug 2010, Hightown, Sefton Coast, Lancs. Photo: © RWD
Deep within the flower are curled ribbon-shaped lilac-coloured strips, most likely anthers bearing pollen.


3rd July 2010, Hare Parrock quarry, Silverdale, Lancs. Photo: © RWD
The thin grass-like leaves peel away from the stem at regular intervals.


9th Aug 2014, dune slacks, Hightown, Sefton Coast. Photo: © RWD
A White variant sometimes occurs. The small sepal tube greatly expands when fruiting and the petals have withered to a brown/black irregular proboscis sticking out (top left).


26th Aug 2016, dunes, Formby, Sefton Coast. Photo: © RWD
In August / September the petals drop off leaving an enlarging sepal cup complete at first with the long, narrow sepal teeth.


26th Aug 2016, dunes, Formby, Sefton Coast. Photo: © RWD
These capsules contain the developing seeds


26th Aug 2016, dunes, Formby, Sefton Coast. Photo: © RWD
The tube turns brown with the sepal teeth ready to drop off.


26th Aug 2016, dunes, Formby, Sefton Coast. Photo: © RWD
The membranes decay leaving a skeleton cage with the seeds free to escape. Your Author found no seeds in these, which have presumably escaped.


Confusingly, in Scotland this flower is called Bluebell. It grows in short grasslands and other dry grassy places, old sand dunes, cliffs and other rocky places, both on acid and limy soils, preferring neither.

Easily confused with : Peach-leaved Bellflower, but Harebell has long linear leaves like those of Purple Toadflax whereas Peach-leaved Bellflower has very shorter wider. Also, the open end of the bell is much wider on Peach-leaved Bellflower more like that of a loudspeaker cone than a tuba. Also, the stigma splits into three much deeper into the bell than it does in Harebell where the stigma splits into three much nearer the end.

No relation to : Hare's-Foot Clover () which is a member of the Pea Family (Fabaceae) nor to Hare's-Tail Cotton-Grass (Eriophorum vaginatum), Slender Hare's-ear (Bupleurum tenuissimum), Sickle Hare's-ear (Bupleurum falcatum), Small Hare's-ear (Bupleurum baldense), Hare's-foot Sedge (Carex lachenalli or Hare's-tail (Lagarus ovatus which are all in the disparate families.

There are several subspecies recognised, and some that may yet to be resolved. ssp. rotundifolia and ssp. montana which occupies mostly upland areas. The photographs above may represent any number of these subspecies.

Harebell is almost ubiquitous, occupying every part of Britain avoiding only parts of Devon & Cornwall, the far North of Scotland and the Middle Level Navigations and Fens.

As with most Campanula the stems ooze a milky-white latex when broken, believed to be mostly harmless.

Harebell is the County Flower of Antrim, Dumfriesshire and Yorkshire.


  Campanula rotundifolia  ⇐ Global Aspect ⇒ Campanulaceae  

Distribution
family8bellflower family8Campanulaceae

 BSBI maps
genus8campanula
Campanula
(Bellflowers)

HAREBELL

SCOTTISH BLUEBELL

Campanula rotundifolia

Bellflower Family [Campanulaceae]  

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