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MIDLAND HAWTHORN

Crataegus laevigata

Rose Family [Rosaceae]

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category
category8Trees
category
category8Broadleaf
category
category8Deciduous
status
statusZnative

flower
flower8pink
inner
inner8cream
morph
morph8actino
petals
petalsZMany
stem
stem8round
sex
sexZbisexual


MIDLAND HAWTHORN

Crataegus laevigata
Sorry, your Author has not got any photos of the pure form, the white flowered one.




MIDLAND HAWTHORN

Cultivated Variety
Crataegus laevigata Rosea Flora Pleno

24th April 2016, by rly, Town Green, Maghull, Merseyside. Photo: © RWD
Midland Hawthorn has white flowers; whereas all those witn pink or red flowers are cultivars, as here. It grows to 12m high, this specimen is far short of that, at maybe 6m?


24th April 2016, by rly, Town Green, Maghull, Merseyside. Photo: © RWD
Moreover, you wouldn't believe how much these Crataegus species hybridise with each other (which includes 5 species of Hawthorns and 7 species of Cockspurthorns - not counting their sub-species!). And this is not to mention the cross-species Haw-medlar tree which theoretically cannot be both in the Crataegus genus and the Mespilus genus [which usually means the taxonomy is wrong somewhere - to be sorted out sometime by taxonomists].
With this in mind, and the difficulty in discriminating between them (there are far too many cultivars flying about!), it is quite possible these have been mis-identified by your Author! But they do look similar to Midland Hawthorn...
The branches are more-spreading than those of Hawthorn.


24th April 2016, by rly, Town Green, Maghull, Merseyside. Photo: © RWD
Midland Hawthorn has spines which are less spiny and more flexible than those of Hawthorn.


24th April 2016, by rly, Town Green, Maghull, Merseyside. Photo: © RWD
The flowers of Midland Hawthorn are white. But this is one of the cultivars of Midland Hawthorn, which can have pink or red flowers hence the 'Rosea' part of its name.


24th April 2016, by rly, Town Green, Maghull, Merseyside. Photo: © RWD
The flowers are only just opening here. They open up until they are more than 15mm across. It has a plethora of petals in keeping with the rest of its name, 'Flora Plena'


24th April 2016, by rly, Town Green, Maghull, Merseyside. Photo: © RWD
The number of styles it has varies from 2 to 3, although on occasion it can have only one style.


24th April 2016, by rly, Town Green, Maghull, Merseyside. Photo: © RWD
The leaves are tri-lobed and moreover only shallowly-lobed (not penta-lobed and deeply cur as are those of Hawthorn).


24th April 2016, by rly, Town Green, Maghull, Merseyside. Photo: © RWD
A typical triangular leaf with three shallow, rounded lobes at the end. The lobes extend less than halfway to the midrib.


Hybridizes with : Flower ()

  • Hawthorn (Crataegus monogyna) to produce Crataegus × media which is common where Midland Hawthorn is found. It is fertile and covers the full spectrum of forms between the two parents.
The cultivars of Midland Hawthorn belong to somewhere in the continuous spectrum from Midland Hawthorn to Crataegus × media

There are as many stones in a fruit on Midland Hawthorn as there are styles, usually 2 or 3, but occasionally just one as in Hawthorn. The stones often need prising apart as they usually 'weld' (or 'meld' if you like) themselves together.

It is native and often to be found in shaded places, hedges being one of them. It is common only in Central, Eastern and the South East of England. Elsewhere it is probably naturalised, such as in the West to wales, Northwards to Central Scotland, Isle of Man, Channel Islands and Ireland.


  Crataegus laevigata  ⇐ Global Aspect ⇒ Rosaceae  

Distribution
 family8Rose family8Rosaceae
 BSBI maps
genus8Crataegus
Crataegus
(Hawthorns)

MIDLAND HAWTHORN

Crataegus laevigata

Rose Family [Rosaceae]