categoryZClimbers Climbers List 
categoryZDeciduous Deciduous List 

HONEYSUCKLE

Lonicera periclymenum

Honeysuckle Family [Caprifoliaceae]

month8jun month8june month8jul month8july month8aug month8sep month8sept

Berries: berryZpossible        berryZgreen berryZred  (poisonous, glace-like)
berry8aug berry8sep berry8sept berry8oct berry8nov

category
category8Climbers
 
category
category8Deciduous
 
status
statusZnative
 
flower
flower8yellow
 
inner
inner8red inner8pink inner8mauve
 
inner
inner8pink
 
morph
morph8zygo
 
petals
petalsZ2
 
petals
petalsZcleft petalsZcut
(5)
type
typeZclustered
 
stem
stem8round
 
smell
smell8scent
scent
toxicity
toxicityZmedium
 

30th June 2009, Minton, Shropshire. Photo: © RWD
A deciduous woody climber, lacking tendrils, a twining clockwise to 7m or longer.


30th June 2009, Minton, Shropshire. Photo: © RWD
Un-opened flowers pink to whitish, opened flowers white and creamy-yellowish darkening on pollination to a buff-coloured orange.


30th June 2009, Minton, Shropshire. Photo: © RWD
A pollinated flower tinged orange.


7th Aug 2009, Ainsdale dunes, Sefton Coast, Lancs. Photo: © RWD
Un-opened flowers white / pink. They all emanate from a central area where later the red berries will appear.


7th Aug 2009, Ainsdale dunes, Sefton Coast, Lancs. Photo: © RWD
Stamens protrude from opened flowers, which lose their reddish-pink colouring to become white. [Narrow linear leaves with what may look like salt deposits belong to Sea-Buckthorn].


7th Aug 2009, Ainsdale dunes, Sefton Coast, Lancs. Photo: © RWD
Petals turning yellowish when pollinated.


7th Aug 2009, Ainsdale dunes, Sefton Coast, Lancs. Photo: © RWD
Petals are split into two lips, a wide upper, and a much narrower lower. The upper is deeply cleft into four fingers.


7th Aug 2009, Ainsdale dunes, Sefton Coast, Lancs. Photo: © RWD
Stamens have a 'T-bar' cream-coloured anther. Central stigma has a small pale-yellow disc.


7th Aug 2009, Ainsdale dunes, Sefton Coast, Lancs. Photo: © RWD
Leaves oval, un-toothed and opposite. They are either un-stalked or have only short stalks. Berries green turning red.


21st Aug 2004, nr Humphrey Head, Cumbria. Photo: © RWD
Berries becoming red and glace-like as if semi-translucent. They are poisonous and in small compact masses, and do not turn black.


Easily mistaken for : Garden Honeysuckle (Lonicera × italica), a hybrid between Perfoliate Honeysuckle (Lonicera caprifolium) and Etruscan Honeysuckle Lonicera etrusca, which is also perfoliate (the two opposite leaves totally encircle their stem) and appears not to have any existence in the UK apart from perhaps in gardens.

Easily mis-identified as : Garden Honeysuckle (Lonicera × italica), and indeed, your Author is not 100% sure that he has not...

Related to : Himalayan Honeysuckle (Leycesteria formosa) [a plant with similar name in the same family but in a differing Genus, Leycestaria].

In the daytime the flowers have hardly any fragrance but this changes in the evening when they emanate a strong floral essence to attract the Sphinx Moth (Sphingidae) which hovers whilst drinking the nectar whilst at the same time pollinating the flowers.

The essential oil of Honeysuckle contains Eugenol, Vanillin the terpenes Ocimene and Linalool, the sesquiterpenes α-Farnesene, Germacrene D, and the Jasmonoid compounds (-)-Methyl Jasmonate, (+)-epi-Methyl Jasmonate, Jasmone, and (-)-Jasmin Lactone.

JASMONOIDS

These jasmonoids make important contributions to the high fragrance of Honeysuckle.

(-)-Methyl Jasmonate and (+)-epi-Methyl Jasmonate are stereoisomers of each other and are air-borne signalling molecules and plant auxins (see Jasmonate Plant Hormones).


Jasmone has both the odour of Jasmine flowers and occurs in them, produced in the metabolism of Jasmonates. It can exist in two stereoisomers , cis-Jasmone and trans-Jasmone, but in nature exists as just the cis-steroisomer. It is used in cosmetics and perfumes. It has the ability to attract certain insects whilst repelling others.

Jasmin Lactone (aka (Z)-2-Pentenylpentan-5-olide or Z-Dec-7-en-5-olide ) is also used as a flavouring compound and as a fragrance with a sweet and warm odour. It's optical antipode ((+)-(S)--(Z)-Dec-7-en-5-olide) occurs in Tuberose (Polianthes tuberosa) flowers which are native to Mexico. Note that both oxygen atoms have been re-arranged in comparison to the other three Jasmonoids. Methyl Jasmone and Jasmin Lactone also occur in Ceylon Tea (Sri Lankan Tea).


  Lonicera periclymenum  ⇐ Global Aspect ⇒ Caprifoliaceae  

Distribution
 family8Honeysuckle family8Caprifoliaceae

 BSBI maps
genus8Lonicera
Lonicera
(Honeysuckles)

HONEYSUCKLE

Lonicera periclymenum

Honeysuckle Family [Caprifoliaceae]