ICE-PLANT

BUTTERFLY STONECROP

Sedum spectabile

Stonecrop Family [Crassulaceae]

month8jul month8july month8aug month8sep month8sept

status
statusZalien
flower
flower8pink
inner
inner8red
morph
morph8actino
petals
petalsZ5
type
typeZclustered
stem
stem8round

7th Sept 2009, a garden, Birch Rd, Walkden, Gtr Mcr. Photo: © RWD
Shorter than Orpine with broader half-domed flower-heads.


26th Aug 2009, a garden, Birch Rd, Walkden, Gtr Mcr. Photo: © RWD
Flowers pale pink to reddish-purple, as are those of Orpine. Both Stace and Fitter Fitter and Blamey say that the leaves are in opposite pairs, or in whorls of three, but it is proving hard to find examples of this, and Blamey actually draws it with alternate leaves! Very strange! Succulent stems light-green rather than the reddish of Orpine.


7th Sept 2009, a garden, Birch Rd, Walkden, Gtr Mcr. Photo: © RWD
Usually depicted with a pink head and a fuzzy top surface.


26th Aug 2009, a garden, Birch Rd, Walkden, Gtr Mcr. Photo: © RWD
The flower head is wider and flatter than that of Orpine and not dissimilar to Broccoli in bud stage.


7th Sept 2009, a garden, Birch Rd, Walkden, Gtr Mcr. Photo: © RWD
The fuzziness of the top of the head is due to the five creamy-white pointed petals and the pinkish-red fruits with their five points, all pointing skywards before the petals properly unfold.


26th Aug 2009, a garden, Birch Rd, Walkden, Gtr Mcr. Photo: © RWD
Un-opened flower buds light-green, bottom. .


26th Aug 2009, a garden, Birch Rd, Walkden, Gtr Mcr. Photo: © RWD
Opening flower buds creamy white with a pinkish-red centre


7th Sept 2009, a garden, Birch Rd, Walkden, Gtr Mcr. Photo: © RWD
When fully un-folded the petals turn pinkish.


7th Sept 2009, a garden, Birch Rd, Walkden, Gtr Mcr. Photo: © RWD
Petals narrower than those of Orpine.


7th Sept 2009, a garden, Birch Rd, Walkden, Gtr Mcr. Photo: © RWD
The petals wither away leaving the fruits which turn a darker shade of red.


26th Aug 2009, a garden, Birch Rd, Walkden, Gtr Mcr. Photo: © RWD
Developing fruits pink at first turning redder and rounder (centre right)


26th Aug 2009, a garden, Birch Rd, Walkden, Gtr Mcr. Photo: © RWD
Fruits go darker.


7th Sept 2009, a garden, Birch Rd, Walkden, Gtr Mcr. Photo: © RWD
Ah, maybe here the leaves are as they are described in text books: wider than those of Orpine, with either in opposite pairs or whorls of three, and with crenate (convex) to serrate (concave) teeth. It seems to the Author that the text books might need revision?


Not to be semantically confused with another Ice-plant [a plant of Portugal and the Mediterranean regions (not UK) with the same common name which belongs to the Mesembryanemum Genus (Hottentots)]

Easily mis-identified as : Orpine (Sedum telephium), but that is taller, with a half-round flower-head (rather than the wider and flatter of Ice-plant), and has leaves that are alternate (rather than the [supposedly] opposite or whorls of three of Ice-plant).

Hybridizes with : Orpine (Sedum telephium)to produce Sedum 'Herbstfreude' aka Autumn Stonecrop/Autumn Joy which differs from Ice-plant/Butterfly Stonecrop which has leaves in opposition in that at least some of the leaves are a alternate and is sterile and of garden origin, but escapees.

Slight resemblance to : Caucasian Stonecrop (Sedum spurium) in that it also has red flowers of similar size.

Presumably it is called Butterfly Stonecrop because it attracts butterflies. Grows on waysides and elsewhere. Grown especially in Gardens.

You are much more likely to find this growing in or near a garden than growing in the wild, but it does sometimes, usually as escapes.


  Sedum spectabile  ⇐ Global Aspect ⇒ Crassulaceae  

Distribution
 family8Stonecrop family8Crassulaceae

 BSBI maps
genus8Sedum
Sedum
(Stonecrops)

ICE-PLANT

BUTTERFLY STONECROP

Sedum spectabile

Stonecrop Family [Crassulaceae]