MARTAGON LILY

Lilium martagon

Lily Family [Liliaceae]

month8jun month8june month8jul month8july

status
statusZneophyte
 
flower
flower8mauve
 
inner
inner8red
 
morph
morph8actino
 
petals
petalsZ6
 
type
typeZspiked
 
stem
stem8round
 
smell
smell8scented
scented
toxicity
toxicityZmedium
 
contact
contactZlowish
 
sex
sexZbisexual
 

2nd Aug 2015, unkknown location. Photo: © Mike Baldwin
It grows to 1.5m and is well naturalised in woods, although this looks like a farmers field.

The flowers start maturing from the bottom upwards; many of those near the top have yet to open and the six unopened tepals are directed downwards. Lower down the flowers, which are on alternate sides of the stem, have opened and curled up over the top leaving the long deep-red anthers dangling downwards on long pale filaments.

Two short leaf-like bracts are either side of the long, brownish, terminally-drooping flower stalk.

Lower down the stem the bracts become larger. Much further down passed two opposite branches are what look like a whorl of larger leaves.



2nd Aug 2015, unkknown location. Photo: © Mike Baldwin
The flowers are 4cm across with 6 tepals, which if measured straightened up are up to 3.5cm long.


2nd Aug 2015, unknown location. Photo: © Mike Baldwin
The single style with a 3-lobed stigma sitting in the centre is a darker colour than the 6 surrounding anthers almost equi-length redder anthers.


2nd Aug 2015, unkknown location. Photo: © Mike Baldwin
The deeper-red blotches do not appear to have longish pimples, unlike the cultivated species below.

Note the appressed hairs on the stem, which curves over nearer the flower in order to suspend the flower chandelier-style.







Lilium speciosa 'Uchidia'

A cultivar which looks roughly similar

24th Aug 2011, a garden, nr. Lathom, Burscough, Lancs. Photo: © RWD
Here at the top there are far fewer flowers, some as-yet un-opened. Beneath the flowers are many nearly-opposite elliptic-lanceolate leaves, many almost stalkless apart from nearer the top where the stalks become slightly longer.


24th Aug 2011, a garden, nr. Lathom, Burscough, Lancs. Photo: © RWD
The petals are, like those of Martagon Lily in the above set, are not pink all over but also have whitish parts as well as the red spots, which are like long pimples.


24th Aug 2011, a garden, nr. Lathom, Burscough, Lancs. Photo: © RWD
Flower with drooping sexual organs. Note the beetroot-coloured bell-shaped tepal cup at the top from which the flower is supported, albeit upside-down!


24th Aug 2011, a garden, nr. Lathom, Burscough, Lancs. Photo: © RWD
The 6 central dark-red ribs on the back of the open tepals look like they are instumental in curling the tepals into an 'up and over' job (to copy a phrase widely used by some rugby commentator). The petals are wrinkled at their edges


24th Aug 2011, a garden, nr. Lathom, Burscough, Lancs. Photo: © RWD
The central style is surrounded by 6 T-bar anthers.


24th Aug 2011, a garden, nr. Lathom, Burscough, Lancs. Photo: © RWD
The anthers are T-bar in form (unlike those of Martagon Lily in the topmost set above) pale green filaments which narrow towards the anther covered in rusty-orange coloured pollen.

This is in contrast to the style which broadens slightly to the stigma which is match-head in colour (which has some stray pollen on it).



24th Aug 2011, a garden, nr. Lathom, Burscough, Lancs. Photo: © RWD
As-yet un-opened flower pods.


24th Aug 2011, a garden, nr. Lathom, Burscough, Lancs. Photo: © RWD
The red spots are now seen to be red pimples, the ones nearer the centre of the flower having long white stalks.


24th Aug 2011, a garden, nr. Lathom, Burscough, Lancs. Photo: © RWD
Leaves elliptic-lanceolate, here in a spiral staircase configuration, but maybe not all specimens do the spiral bit?


Uniquely identifiable characteristics

Distinguishing Feature : see captions

No relation to : Lily-of-the-Valley (Convallaria majalis/) [plants with similar names belonging to differing families, this one to Asparagaceae - or at least for the 2010 decade].

There are a lot more plants whose common name has the word 'Lily' but do not belong to the Lilium genus. Five genera belong to the Liliaceae family, namely: Gagea, Tulipa, Lilium, Erythronium and Fritillaria - at least for the time being until more taxonomists change genera around.

Go to the Liliaceae page for a list of all families which used to be within the Liliaceae family but are no longer.

Like many Lilies it is poisonous to eat and often leads to kidney failure, then death if not treated with haste. Cats are the animals which are most vulnerable to this plant - usually from the toxic pollen which may dust their fur coat as they disturb the plant which they can ingest when preening their fur.

It has the same colours as does a similar species called 'Stargazer' but that faces upwards (which is why it got the name 'stargazer' whereas Martagon Lily faces downwards!

The specific epithet 'Martagon' is a Turkish word meaning 'Turban'.


  Lilium martagon  ⇐ Global Aspect ⇒ Liliaceae  

Distribution
 family8Lily family8Liliaceae
 BSBI maps
genus8Lilium
Lilium
(Lilies)

MARTAGON LILY

Lilium martagon

Lily Family [Liliaceae]