NARROW-LEAVED LUNGWORT

Pulmonaria longifolia

Borage Family [Boraginaceae]

month8mar month8march month8apr month8april month8may

status
statusZnative
flower
flower8bicolour
inner
inner8pink
flower
flower8blue
morph
morph8actino
petals
petalsZ5
type
typeZtrumpet
stem
stem8square
toxicity
toxicityZmedium
rarity
rarityZscarce

20th April 2009, Parkhurst, IoW. Photo: (CC by 2.0) Mike Cotterill
Grows erect to 40cm high.


20th April 2009, Parkhurst, IoW. Photo: (CC by 2.0) Mike Cotterill
The basal leaves are narrow-elliptical and usually less than 5cm wide.


20th April 2009, Parkhurst, IoW. Photo: (CC by 2.0) Mike Cotterill


20th April 2009, Parkhurst, IoW. Photo: (CC by 2.0) Mike Cotterill
The stems have downwardly-angled hairs. The leaves are decurrent (are stalkless and gradually merge with the stem downwards).


20th April 2009, Parkhurst, IoW. Photo: (CC by 2.0) Mike Cotterill
The inflorescence usually has no stalked glands. The calyx teeth are acute and have hongish hairs.


20th April 2009, Parkhurst, IoW. Photo: (CC by 2.0) Mike Cotterill
The corolla tube (petals) is blue to violet when opened, but red to purple when developing.
20th April 2009, Parkhurst, IoW. Photo: (CC by 2.0) Mike Cotterill
The corolla tube is hairless on the inside below the hair tufts.


20th April 2009, Parkhurst, IoW. Photo: (CC by 2.0) Mike Cotterill
The leave have short hairs. The pale splodges on the leaves seem to come in 3 or 4 differing sizes.


20th April 2009, Parkhurst, IoW. Photo: (CC by 2.0) Mike Cotterill
The central portion of the leaf, showing the pale splodges which occur over all the upper surface of the leaf. Note also that each pale splodge, regardless of size, has a tiny pale-green pimple in the centre. Your Author wonders if these pale-green pimples are hydathodes, or not. [Hydathodes usually occur singly at the tip of the leaves, so maybe these are not hydathodes(?)]




PROBABLY A GARDEN VARIETY

5th May 2007, a garden, Walkden, Gtr M/cr. Photo: © RWD
It has much narrower leaves than does Lungwort.


5th May 2007, a garden, Walkden, Gtr M/cr. Photo: © RWD
Stems still square with first pinkish-red flowers which may turn blue.


5th May 2007, a garden, Walkden, Gtr M/cr. Photo: © RWD
Leaves seem to be a lot more blotched with large pale-green splodges than do the spots of Lungwort.


5th May 2007, a garden, Walkden, Gtr M/cr. Photo: © RWD
The flowers are a deeper shade of blue than are those of Lungwort.


5th May 2007, a garden, Walkden, Gtr M/cr. Photo: © RWD
The specifications say that it has far fewer glandular hairs than does of Lungwort, but maybe this is a garden variety?


Some similarities to : Pulmonaria angustifolia [which seems to have no common name despite being a popular garden plant from Europe] also has long leaves, but the two are easily distinguished from one another, the latter lacks marks on the leaves.

Uniquely identifiable characteristics

Distinguishing Feature :

Just like Lungwort it contains poisonous Pyrrolizidine Alkaloids.

It is a rare [RR] and Native. You are only likely to find it growing wild in Dorset, South Hants and the Isle of Wight, it but does occur as a garden escape infrequently elsewhere. It grows in woods and scrub.

The flowers of Lungworts are heterostylous, meaning that there are two flower types, the pin (aka longistylous) form and the thrum (aka brevistylous) form. The two forms are sexually mutually exclusive - either form can only fertilise the opposite form - they are said to exhibit heteromorphic self-incompatibility. See Primrose for examples of pin and thrum forms.


  Pulmonaria longifolia  ⇐ Global Aspect ⇒ Boraginaceae  

Distribution
 family8Borage family8Boraginaceae
 BSBI maps
genus8Pulmonaria
Pulmonaria
(Lungworts)

NARROW-LEAVED LUNGWORT

Pulmonaria longifolia

Borage Family [Boraginaceae]