MOUNTAIN PANSY

Viola lutea

Violet Family [Violaceae]

month8may month8jun month8june month8jul month8july month8aug

status
statusZnative
flower
flower8yellow
inner
inner8cream
morph
morph8zygo
petals
petalsZ5
type
typeZspurred
stem
stem8round

26th May 2015, Chelmorton, Derbyshire. Photo: © RWD
Grows on mountain grassland preferring lime (as here at 415m above sea level, but at up to 1050m).


26th May 2015, Chelmorton, Derbyshire. Photo: © RWD
A single flower atop an upright but crooked (at the top) and leafless stem up to 20cm high.


26th May 2015, Chelmorton, Derbyshire. Photo: © RWD
Usually the flowers are all-yellow, but often all blue-violet, or with 2 yellow petals at the top and three blue-violet ones at the bottom.


26th May 2015, Chelmorton, Derbyshire. Photo: © RWD
Whatever colour they are, they have dark cat's whisker like markings on the lower 3 petals.


26th May 2015, Chelmorton, Derbyshire. Photo: © RWD
The two upper petals are separated from the lower three by a short white cylindrical section. Flowers are larger than other pansies, between 20 - 35mm from top to bottom.


26th May 2015, Chelmorton, Derbyshire. Photo: © RWD
Leaves similar to other Pansies, variable sizes, oval, the larger having forwardly-directed blunt-teeth.


26th May 2015, Chelmorton, Derbyshire. Photo: © RWD
Purple-indigo coloured sepals enclose un-opened flowers. Leaves with short white hairs.


26th May 2015, Chelmorton, Derbyshire. Photo: © RWD
The five dark-purple sepals give the appearance of a sharpened pencil. Not hairy leaves.


26th May 2015, Chelmorton, Derbyshire. Photo: © RWD
The sepals have shorter 'appendages' at the rear.


26th May 2015, Chelmorton, Derbyshire. Photo: © RWD
The spur of the flower (deep purple and on the left of the grooved violet stem in this photo) is said to be three-times longer than the sepal appendages (top of photo) on Mountain Pansy. Flower still not yet opened.


26th May 2015, Chelmorton, Derbyshire. Photo: © RWD
Purple flower spur (far right) 3x longer than sepal appendages. There are five sepals altogether; two each side and one hiding from this photo at the top.


26th May 2015, Chelmorton, Derbyshire. Photo: © RWD
Sepals and spur in close-up.


26th May 2015, Chelmorton, Derbyshire. Photo: © RWD
Flower spur directed upwards, three sepals for the upper 4 petals, and two sepals parallel to the flower-stem (at least they are in this photo)


26th May 2015, Chelmorton, Derbyshire. Photo: © RWD
In this photo spur curved and pointing upwards, plus 5 sepals and their appendages all over the place (in this photo).


Easily mis-identified as : other Pansies such as Wild Pansy (Viola tricolor).

Hybridises with :

  • Wild Pansy (Viola tricolor) found in Derbyshire and South Northumberland only but difficult to identify. appearance is closer to that of Mountain Pansy.
  • Field Pansy (Viola arvensis) possibly grows in NW Yorkshire and Roxburghs with much smaller yellow flowers than Mountain Pansy but larger than those of Field Pansy.

Mountain Pansy is a native, perennial flower which spreads by slender rhizomes. The pollen grains usually have four pores, but a microscope is needed to see them. It grows in upland grassland pastures, rocky places preferring limey soils or heavy metalliferous soils such as ultramafic (serpentinic) or calamine soils, growing up to 1050m above sea level. However, it seems that they are not metallophytes, but rather excluders of heavy metals in the soils. Those Mountain Volets which do grow in calamine soils should be treated as Viola lutea ssp. calaminaria.


  Viola lutea  ⇐ Global Aspect ⇒ Violaceae  

Distribution
 family8Violet family8Violaceae

 BSBI maps
genus8Viola
Viola
(Violas)

MOUNTAIN PANSY

Viola lutea

Violet Family [Violaceae]