Galls and Rusts List 

PEPPERMINT

EAU de COLOGNE MINT

Mentha × piperita

Mint / Dead-Nettle Family [Lamiaceae]

month8jul month8july month8aug month8sep month8sept month8oct

status
statusZarchaeophyte
 
flower
flower8lilac
 
morph
morph8hemizygo
 
petals
petalsZ4
 
type
typeZtieredwhorls
 
type
typeZspiked
 
stem
stem8square
 
sex
sexZsterile
 

smell
smell8peppermint
peppermint
smell
smell8Eau de Cologne
Eau-de-Cologne

6th Sept 2012, Macclesfield Canal, just north of Congleton. Photo: © RWD
A Mint which grows to 0.9m high.


6th Sept 2012, Macclesfield Canal, just north of Congleton. Photo: © RWD
The flowerheads are spikes of flowers in pyramidal, cylindrical or rounded heads with lilac petals.


6th Sept 2012, Macclesfield Canal, just north of Congleton. Photo: © RWD
Grows near water, usually.


6th Sept 2012, Macclesfield Canal, just north of Congleton. Photo: © RWD


6th Sept 2012, Macclesfield Canal, just north of Congleton. Photo: © RWD
The leaves on this specimen have been infected with a gall which has produced orange lumps both top and bottom.


6th Sept 2012, Macclesfield Canal, just north of Congleton. Photo: © RWD
Inflorescence variously pyramidal, rounded, or cylindrical.


6th Sept 2012, Macclesfield Canal, just north of Congleton. Photo: © RWD


6th Sept 2012, Macclesfield Canal, just north of Congleton. Photo: © RWD
The calyx tubes, here brownish-purple, are tubular to bell-shaped and 2.5 to 4.5mm long.


6th Sept 2012, Macclesfield Canal, just north of Congleton. Photo: © RWD
Unlike Spear Mint, where the stamens protrude from the flower opening, the stamens do not protrude from the flower in Peppermint. The sepal teeth are really long and taper only gradually. (The two-pronged styles often protrude though). The flowers are sterile, unable to reproduce sexually.


6th Sept 2012, Macclesfield Canal, just north of Congleton. Photo: © RWD
These are the long hairy sepal teeth after flowering.


6th Sept 2012, Macclesfield Canal, just north of Congleton. Photo: © RWD
Leaves are ovate shaped to oblong-lanceolate, and either cuneate (having a triangular taper) to sub-cordate (a shallower ace-of-spades shape) at their base. The teeth are sharpish but not deep, but usually deeper cut than are these - look at the other photos where they are actually quite deeply cut.


6th Sept 2012, Macclesfield Canal, just north of Congleton. Photo: © RWD
Stems are square. This one shows two side-branches, and two leaf stalks.


Not to be semantically confused with : Pepper [made from a plant with similar name but with a very hot taste]

According to Clive Stace it is (probably) a neo-native (which your Author did not invent a category for because not even Stace himself has mentioned that neoword in his previous descriptions of the status of plants). It presumably means it is a very recent native plant.

When Peppermint is hairless then it is usually an escapee or a throw-out. When it is hairy it is a spontaneous uprising. It grows in damp ground, near water, or in waste places.

Peppermint is the hybrid between Water Mint (Mentha ) and Spear Mint (Mentha spicata) and can have two differing spells. When the leaves are crushed it usually smells of Peppermint (as in Polo with the holo, or some toothpastes) when the plant is without hairs but can smell instead of Eau de Cologne on specimens with hairs - which are a differing variety of Peppermint (var. citrata) - which has a rounded inflorescence and ovate or sub-cordate leaves which is often grown in gardens from where it may escape. This variety has the common name of Eau de Cologne Mint. The real Eau de Cologne contains a plethora of aromatic ingredients, so allocating any one compound to that smell is not possible.


  Mentha × piperita  ⇐ Global Aspect ⇒ Lamiaceae  

Distribution
 family8Mint / Dead-Nettle family8Lamiaceae
 BSBI maps
genus8Mentha
Mentha
(Mints)

PEPPERMINT

EAU de COLOGNE MINT

Mentha × piperita

Mint / Dead-Nettle Family [Lamiaceae]