categoryZShrubs Shrubs List 
categoryZSemievergreen Semi-evergreen List 
categoryZBrooadleaf Broadleaf List 

WILD PRIVET

Ligustrum vulgare

Olive Family [Oleaceae]  

Flowers:
month8jun month8june month8jul month8july

Berries: berryZpossible        berryZgreen berryZblack  (poisonous, over-wintering)
berry8Sep berry8Sept berry8Oct berry8Nov berry8Dec

category
category8Shrubs
 
category
category8Semievergreen
 
category
category8Broadleaf
 
status
statusZnative
 
flower
flower8white
 
inner
inner8cream
 
morph
morph8actino
 
petals
petalsZ4
 
type
typeZspiked
 
stem
stem8round
 
smell
smell8strong
strong
toxicity
toxicityZmedium
 

3rd July 2010, on low sea cliffs, north Arnside, Lancs. Photo: © RWD
On a low limestone cliff over-looking Grange over Sands.


16th June 2009, Limestone Paving, Great Orme, N. Wales. Photo: © RWD
Grows in scrub especially on lime.


16th June 2009, Limestone Paving, Great Orme, N. Wales. Photo: © RWD
Leaves more elliptical than Garden Privet. Sometimes rounded at ends.


16th June 2009, Limestone Paving, Great Orme, N. Wales. Photo: © RWD
A spike of flowers populates the end of a stalk, just like Garden Privet.


16th June 2009, Limestone Paving, Great Orme, N. Wales. Photo: © RWD
Flowers white with four petals and with creamy bits inside.


16th June 2009, Limestone Paving, Great Orme, N. Wales. Photo: © RWD
The four petals join about half-way along, unlike in Garden Privet where the un-joined parts are longer. The petals have a strong tendency to go brownish even when fairly young.


3rd July 2010, on low sea cliffs, north Arnside, Lancs. Photo: © RWD
A head of the white flowers clustered together.


3rd July 2010, on low sea cliffs, north Arnside, Lancs. Photo: © RWD
Flowers just opening, revealing inner composition. A black berry or two in the process of forming (lower middle).


3rd July 2010, on low sea cliffs, north Arnside, Lancs. Photo: © RWD
The free part of the petals are split up to half-way; on Garden Privet they are split to over half-way. More black berries forming.


3rd July 2010, on low sea cliffs, north Arnside, Lancs. Photo: © RWD
Four-petalled, brilliantly white flowers.


16th June 2009, Limestone Paving, Great Orme, N. Wales. Photo: © RWD
The obverse of the leaves is a lighter green and without the prominent curved veins of Garden Privet.


27th March 2011, Wandlebury Country Park, Cambridge. Photo: © Roger Foden


Easily confused with : Garden Privet

Some similarities to : Tree Privet

A member of the Olive Family, the fruit is a poisonous shiny black berry.


Syringin, aka Syringoside and Ligustrin, is found in both Lilac (Syringa Vulgaris) and Privets, including Wild Privet. Both belong to the Olive Family. Syringin is a poisonous phenylpropanoid glycoside, present in the berries and the leaves.


Oleuropein, an intensely bitter glucoside, being the tyrosol ester of Elenolic Acid is found in the leaves of both Privets and Olive Trees. It is a powerful anti-oxidant which helps to preserve Olive Oil and imparts a bitter flavour to Extra Virgin Olive Oil. Oleuropein is one of several  Secoiridoid Glycosides, including Ligostride and some oleonids, that are contained in Privet and Olive leaves.

The results of ingesting Privet leaves or berries is at first nausea, followed by vomiting, dizziness, headaches, diarrhoea, gastric disturbances, convulsions and finally circulatory arrest. It is neurotoxic, and livestock fatalities have occurred.


  Ligustrum vulgare  ⇐ Global Aspect ⇒ Oleaceae  

Distribution
 family8Olive family8Oleaceae

 BSBI maps
genus8Ligustrum
Ligustrum
(Privets)

WILD PRIVET

Ligustrum vulgare

Olive Family [Oleaceae]  

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