BROAD-LEAVED RAGWORT

Senecio sarracenicus

(Formerly: Senecio fluviatilis)
Daisy & Dandelion Family [Asteraceae]

month8may month8jun month8june month8jul month8july

Pappus: pappusZpossible (white, simple)
pappus8jul pappus8july pappus8aug pappus8sep pappus8sept pappus8oct

status
statusZneophyte
 
flower
flower8yellow
 
inner
inner8orange
 
morph
morph8actino
 
petals
petalsZ7
(6-8)
stem
stem8round
 
toxicity
toxicityZmedium
 
sex
sexZbisexual
 

Summer, River Eden, nr. Armathwaite, Cumbria Photo: © Jeremy Roberts
A splendid abundance of Broad-leaved Ragwort, occupying its preferred habitat: near water.


Summer, River Eden, nr. Armathwaite, Cumbria Photo: © Jeremy Roberts
It has a very little competition from the pinkish-flowered Himalayan Balsam (on the extreme left)


Summer, River Eden, nr. Armathwaite, Cumbria Photo: © Jeremy Roberts
It is an erect stoloniferous perennial extending upwards up to 1.5m. The leaves are between 4 and 20cm long and more or less glabrous (without hairs).


Summer, River Eden, nr. Armathwaite, Cumbria Photo: © Jeremy Roberts


Summer, River Eden, nr. Armathwaite, Cumbria Photo: © Jeremy Roberts
The inflorescence is multiply-branched near the top. [An unknown interloping leaf at the bottom]


Summer, River Eden, nr. Armathwaite, Cumbria Photo: © Jeremy Roberts


Summer, River Eden, nr. Armathwaite, Cumbria Photo: © Jeremy Roberts
The flowers have between 6 to 8 ray florets (mostly 8 it seems to your Author) and are between 15 to 30mm across. The inner bracts have a short blackened triangle at their tips; the outer bracts fewer and shorter, sometimes splayed out a little. The inner disc florets form a small compact raised cluster in the centre and are often yellow-orange.


Summer, River Eden, nr. Armathwaite, Cumbria Photo: © Jeremy Roberts
The leaves are broad, hence the name with the teeth often blunt at the tip, sometimes with an in-curved apex as seen on that leaf lower right.


Photo: © Alyson Freeman
It is an erect stoloniferous perennial extending upwards up to 1.5m. The leaves are between 4 and 20cm long and more or less glabrous (without hairs). The leaves of this specimen suffering from a mould, mildew?

Nearly spent flowers on upper right; spent flowers on left.



Photo: © Alyson Freeman
The leaves are short-stalked (lower leaves) to stalkless (upper), lanceolate to oblong-lanceolate and with unequal forwardly-directed short teeth (best seen lower right). The flowers yellow with (mostly) between 6 to 8 rays which are 8 to 15mm long (this was taken late in the year when the ray florets have mostly fallen off). The phyllaries are hairy (as are the long peduncles [flower stalks]) form are long-narrow jug.


Photo: © Alyson Freeman
A single flower which has lost most of its petals. The inner bisexual disc florets can be more clearly seen.


The florets here are going to seed. Photo: © Alyson Freeman


17th Sept 2019, moist Bond Hurst Woods, Chatburn, Clitheroe. Photo: © RWD
Mostly gone to seed.


17th Sept 2019, moist Bond Hurst Woods, Chatburn, Clitheroe. Photo: © RWD
The seeds occur singly on individual parachute hairs, the numerous parachutes are clustered into a globe.


17th Sept 2019, moist Bond Hurst Woods, Chatburn, Clitheroe. Photo: © RWD
The spent flowers in their narrowish sepal cups are now turning into numerous white parachutes slightly poking out of their now even narrower (in relation to their length) sepal cups.


17th Sept 2019, moist Bond Hurst Woods, Chatburn, Clitheroe. Photo: © RWD
The globed arrangement of several long, narrow, pale-fawn seeds each with its own set of parachute hairs ready to take the seed away on any passing breeze.


17th Sept 2019, moist Bond Hurst Woods, Chatburn, Clitheroe. Photo: © RWD
The parachutes are simple - sitting directly atop the seed (rather than being atop a white pedestal emerging from the top of each seed). Each individual white hair also looks to be simple (rather than feathered as some other species of Asteraceae are).


Not to be semantically confused with : Ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia) [a plant with similar name in the same family, Asteraceae]

Uniquely identifiable characteristics

Distinguishing Feature : For a Ragwort: The broad leaves.

It is a neophyte which grows in wettish places such as besides streams, ponds, wet woodlands, marshy places or in fens or swamps.


  Senecio sarracenicus  ⇐ Global Aspect ⇒ Asteraceae  

Distribution
 family8Daisy & Dandelion family8Asteraceae
 BSBI maps
genus8Senecio
Senecio
(Ragworts)

BROAD-LEAVED RAGWORT

Senecio sarracenicus

(Formerly: Senecio fluviatilis)
Daisy & Dandelion Family [Asteraceae]