categoryZGrasses Grasses List 

DWARF SEDGE

Carex humilis

Sedge Club- & Spike-Rush Family [Cyperaceae]

month8mar month8march month8apr month8april

category
category8Grasses
 
 
status
statusZnative
 
 
flower
flower8purple
male
purple-brown
flower
flower8red
female
red-brown
petals
petalsZ0
 
 
type
typeZspiked
 
 
stem
stem8round
solid
 
rarity
rarityZscarce
 
 
sex
sexZmonoecious
 
 

unknown date, Afton Down, Freshwater, IoW Photo: (CC by 2.0) Geoff Toone
Dwarf Sedge is spread over the LH triangle where the 'grass' is a brighter green.


7th Aug 2006, unknown place Photo: (CC by 2.0) Mike Cotterill
The leaves of Dwarf Sedge are curved, emerging in dense clusters from the branches of the underground rhizomes and are bright-green.


7th Aug 2006, unknown place Photo: (CC by 2.0) Mike Cotterill
The leaves here are strongly curved backwards, only a narrow 1 to 1.5mm wide, bright green and are longer than the flowering stems. When mature they become v-shaped in cross-section. The leaves are yellow-green to orange-green.


6th May 2007, Afton Down, Freshwater, IoW Photo: (CC by 2.0) Colin Pope
The flowers in the male spikelets are inconspicuous until the long, fawn to orange-brown male flowers (anthers) near the top come out. [The female spikelets of flowers are in shorter fatter spikes below them - but your Author can see none here]


6th May 2007, Afton Down, Freshwater, IoW Photo: (CC by 2.0) Colin Pope
The long orange-brown anthers at the top of the male spikelets. On the left hand male flower, there might be a shorter female flower just beneath it on the right-hand side of the stem.


24th May 2007, Afton Down, Freshwater, IoW Photo: (CC by 2.0) Colin Pope
The pencil marks the spot where the narrow v-channelled leaves emerge from a rhizome node below the soil.


Dwarf Sedge is so inconspicuous that you may walk straight passed them without knowing, unless you have your eyes tuned to their modal frequency - especially as most of their narrow cigar-shaped spikelets are hidden below the mass of (very narrow) leaves. Only in spring when their anthers are out might they more easily catch the eye. Unlike many sedges their stems are solid with no channel up the centre, but there are quite a few other sedges with solid stems also.

They are a fairly rare [RR] found in the Wiltshire, Hampshire and Dorset Downs and over to the Mendips and the Wye Valley. They are locally abundant.


  Carex humilis  ⇐ Global Aspect ⇒ Cyperaceae  

Distribution
 family8Sedge Club- & Spike-Rush family8Cyperaceae
 BSBI maps
genus8Carex
Carex
(Sedge)

DWARF SEDGE

Carex humilis

Sedge Club- & Spike-Rush Family [Cyperaceae]