ALPINE SQUILL

Scilla bifolia

Asparagus Family [Asparagaceae]

month8feb month8mar month8march

status
statusZneophyte
 
flower
flower8blue
 
flower
flower8azure
 
inner
inner8indigo
 
morph
morph8actino
 
petals
petalsZ6 petalsZ3
(3+3)
type
typeZspiked
 
stem
stem8round
 
toxicity
toxicityZmedium
 

26th Feb 2014, Funtigton Church, Chichester, West Sussex Photo: © Dawn Nelson
Not quite so Alpine as its name might suggest, likes growing in churchyards and on banks (where it spreads if planted). Flowers blue on long petioles (flower stalks).


26th Feb 2014, Funtigton Church, Chichester, West Sussex Photo: © Dawn Nelson
A very early flowerer, February to April.


31st Jan 2014, Photo: © Dawn Nelson
Tepals in a symmetrical planar array, fully outstretched when open. Tepals between 5-10mm long. The leaves number but two, hence 'bifolia'. The leaves are very similar to those of Siberian Squill (Scilla siberica), gradually widening before tapering to a blunt and hooded tip. The plant grows yo a similar height as that too: up to 20cm, but the flowers number more than 1-2 and they do not face the ground. The petioles are also much longer than those on Siberian Squill (Scilla siberica).


31st Jan 2014, Photo: © Dawn Nelson
Bracts beneath petioles either absent altogether or minute. Tepals joined just at their bases, if at all. The ovary is concolorous with the tepals (pale-blue), as are the filaments but the anthers are a darker shade (indigo) On this specimen a flower stalk has fallen off (it would have been the 4th one up)..


Uniquely identifiable characteristics (once you have got to squills)

Distinguishing Feature :

Like all squills, they are poisonous.

For differences between the various Squills see the captions beneath the photos.


  Scilla bifolia  ⇐ Global Aspect ⇒ Asparagaceae  

Distribution
 family8Asparagus family8Asparagaceae

 BSBI maps
genus8Scilla
Scilla
(Squills)

ALPINE SQUILL

Scilla bifolia

Asparagus Family [Asparagaceae]