SIBERIAN SQUILL

Scilla siberica

Asparagus Family [Asparagaceae]

month8mar month8march month8apr month8april month8may

status
statusZneophyte
 
flower
flower8blue
 
inner
inner8blue
 
morph
morph8actino
 
petals
petalsZ6 petalsZ3
(3+3)
stem
stem8angular
 
stem
stem8round
 
toxicity
toxicityZmedium
 

29th March 2018, dunes off Albert Road, Formby, Sefton Coast. Photo: © RWD
A garden plant which escapes into the wild. This area is possibly in the grounds of a long-demolished girls orphanage.


29th March 2018, dunes off Albert Road, Formby, Sefton Coast. Photo: © RWD
This Scilla has deeper-blue flowers than others.


29th March 2018, dunes off Albert Road, Formby, Sefton Coast. Photo: © RWD
The flowers are pendant, drooping downwards when open.


29th March 2018, dunes off Albert Road, Formby, Sefton Coast. Photo: © RWD
The leaves of this one are canoe-shaped and broader than most other Scilla, broadening towards the end before narrowing to a ~60° blunt point.


29th March 2018, dunes off Albert Road, Formby, Sefton Coast. Photo: © RWD
As-yet unopened flowers are initially narrow and upright, but later turn downwards before opening.


29th March 2018, dunes off Albert Road, Formby, Sefton Coast. Photo: © RWD
The flower stems broader at the base and gradually taper to where the flower stalk(s) emerge.


29th March 2018, dunes off Albert Road, Formby, Sefton Coast. Photo: © RWD
Stems up to 20cm tall; these specimens only ~10cm. Flowers per stem is less than 5; this colony have either 1 or 2 flowers per stem.


29th March 2018, dunes off Albert Road, Formby, Sefton Coast. Photo: © RWD
Leaves number 2 per flower stem. Leaves come from underground bulb; none emerge from the flower stem.


29th March 2018, dunes off Albert Road, Formby, Sefton Coast. Photo: © RWD
These 3 flower stems have two flower per stem each, which emerge from the stem via petioles (flower stalks) one above the other.


29th March 2018, dunes off Albert Road, Formby, Sefton Coast. Photo: © RWD
Flowers have 6 bright blue tepals and 6 anthers, each one white where they emerge near the tepal, but may be blue near the anther, which is a duller-blue. The central ovary is green with a single long white style atop, which also may be blue near the end. Flower stem tapers from the bottom, may be round, or angular as here, with minute hairs.


29th March 2018, dunes off Albert Road, Formby, Sefton Coast. Photo: © RWD
Not all flowers are the same shade of blue; some are more sky-blue with merging paler areas. Centre of petals is a darker-blue. The ovary is 3-celled and has 3 shallow grooves and 3 shallower nicks.


29th March 2018, dunes off Albert Road, Formby, Sefton Coast. Photo: © RWD
The anthers are initially a paler indigo and long; when open they display either white ot sea-blue pollen (see photo above this one). The filaments are much thinner than they are broad. The tepals, at 12-16mm long each, are longer than all other Squills.


29th March 2018, dunes off Albert Road, Formby, Sefton Coast. Photo: © RWD
The short petiole emerges from the side of the stalk, with a tiny purple double-pointed bract right beneath it. [This specimen had a second flower emerging from a petiole just a little higher, but it has broken off or been eaten (perhaps by Formby squirrels?)]. Stems are either green or purplish-browm as is this specimen.


29th March 2018, dunes off Albert Road, Formby, Sefton Coast. Photo: © RWD
The green ovary, the 3 sections more well defined in this specimen. Blue anthers but no blueness in this specimen which has totally white filaments and single style.


29th March 2018, dunes off Albert Road, Formby, Sefton Coast. Photo: © RWD
The filaments are flattish and broaden towards the ovary. In this specimen the filaments become blue nearer the blue anthers, as does the style.


29th March 2018, dunes off Albert Road, Formby, Sefton Coast. Photo: © RWD
A paler flower which is sky-blue with a lot more white; only the central stripes are blue. Two tiny purple bracts where the flowers emerge from the stem on their petioles.


29th March 2018, dunes off Albert Road, Formby, Sefton Coast. Photo: © RWD
Your Author ripped some tepals and anthers off this specimen so the reader can see the long green ovaries.


29th March 2018, dunes off Albert Road, Formby, Sefton Coast. Photo: © RWD
Another specimen he 'doctored' - just removing two tepals but leaving the filaments. Notice that the leaves are welded into blunt hood at their white tips, as are the (blue) tepals.


29th March 2018, dunes off Albert Road, Formby, Sefton Coast. Photo: © RWD
The pollen grains (or empty pollen compartments)?.


Easily confused with : other Squills but Siberian Squill less than 6 flowers per stem (usually just one or two), has tiny bracts just 1-2mm long at the junction of stem and petiole, flowers which hang downwards and broader leaves than other Squills, and longer tepals (12-16mm) than all other Squills.

No relation to : Siberian Wallflower (Erysimum x marshallii), Siberian Iris (Iris sibirica), Siberian Crab (Malus baccata), Siberian Violet-willow (Salix acutifolia), Siberian Stonecrop (Sedum hybridum) [plants with similar names belonging to differing families].

Siberian Squill does not come from Siberia but from Russia (with or without love).


  Scilla siberica  ⇐ Global Aspect ⇒ Asparagaceae  

Distribution
 family8Asparagus family8Asparagaceae

 BSBI maps
genus8Scilla
Scilla
(Squills)

SIBERIAN SQUILL

Scilla siberica

Asparagus Family [Asparagaceae]