HEDGE WOUNDWORT

Stachys sylvatica

Mint / Dead-Nettle Family [Lamiaceae]  

month8jun month8june month8jul month8july month8Aug month8sep month8sept month8Oct

status
statusZnative
 
flower
flower8bicolour
 
flower
flower8beetroot
 
inner
inner8white
 
morph
morph8zygo
 
petals
petalsZ2
 
type
typeZtieredwhorls
 
stem
stem8square
 
smell
smell8mousey smell8pong smell8awful smell8stinks smell8reeks smell8nauseous
mousy

25th June 2005, Marple Photo: © RWD


25th June 2005, Marple Photo: © RWD


22nd June 2007, Bridgewater Canal, Salford Photo: © RWD


22nd June 2007, Bridgewater Canal, Salford Photo: © RWD


22nd June 2007, Bridgewater Canal, Salford Photo: © RWD


22nd June 2007, Bridgewater Canal, Salford Photo: © RWD


22nd June 2007, Bridgewater Canal, Salford Photo: © RWD


2nd Aug 2009, ex Windsor High School, Salford, Lancs. Photo: © RWD
The sepal tubes may pale to a salmon pink at the end of the season. Here displaying 2, 3 and 4 black seeds within the sepal tubes.


Hybridises with : Marsh Woundwort (Stachys palustris) to produce Hybrid Woundwort (Stachys × ambigua)

Some similarities to : Red Hemp-Nettle.

Distinguishing Feature : dark beetroot coloured flowers with white blotches. Unpleasant mousy smell.

When any part of this plant is crushed a smell repugnent to most but a few individuals is unleashed. The upper leaves are narrow and a darker green than the lower heart-shaped leaves. The flowers are a dark beetroot shade of purple with white blotches and are covered in tiny bristle-like bracts.

It yields a yellow dye.

The major components of the essential oil in the leaves are : γ-Muurolene (18%), Phytol (12%), Benzaldehyde (8%), β-Caryophyllene (4%), Heptadecane (4%), τ-Cadinol (which is similar to α-Cadinol (3.7%), Germacrene (3.2%), α-Farnesene (3%).

Whereas the essential oil in the flowers γ-Muurolene (16%), Benzaldehyde (14%), Phytol (12%), Pimara-7,15-dien-3-one (4.7%) (which is based on the diterpenoid Pimarane) and Germacrene (3.2%).

Your Author does not know which (if any) of the above molecule(s) are responsible for the repugnant odour.

IRIDOID GLYCOSIDES


The iridoid glycosides presented on this page epitomise the iridoids to be found in members of the Stachys Genus, of which Hedge Woundwort seems to be the representative member (certainly it is more widespread in the UK than is Betony (Stachys officinalis)).


These iridoid glycosides are all similar to Aucubin, another iridoid glycoside found in Stachys genus plants. Ajugoside has an acetyl group, as do the others apart from Harpagide. Harpagoside has a prenyl group attached to the acetyl moiety. Harpagoside, Harpagide and Acetyl Harpagide are the main iridoids found within Betony (Stachys officinalis). These are the active ingredients of folk medicines that have for centuries been used as sedatives, febrifuges, cough medicines, for wound healing and skin complaints. However they are not the most physiologically active components in Stachys. Ajugoside is also present in Bugle (Ajuga reptans), another plant belonging to the same Mint & Dead-nettle family Lamiaceae.


Harpagoside, which has an additional trans-Cinnamic Acid group (on the left), was originally found in the roots of Devil's Claw (Harpagophytum procumbens) which is not native to the UK. Harpagoside is also found in Chinese Figwort (Scrophularia ningpoensis) and has anti-inflammatory properties.


  Stachys sylvatica  ⇐ Global Aspect ⇒ Lamiaceae  

Distribution
family8mint family8Dead-Nettle family8Labiatea  family8Lamiaceae

 BSBI maps
genus8Stachys
Stachys
(Woundworts)

HEDGE WOUNDWORT

Stachys sylvatica

Mint / Dead-Nettle Family [Lamiaceae]  

WildFlowerFinder Homepage