COMMON FIELD-SPEEDWELL

Veronica persica

Plantain Family [Plantaginaceae]

month8jan month8feb month8mar month8march month8apr month8april month8may month8jun month8june month8jul month8july month8aug month8sep month8sept month8oct month8nov month8dec

status
statusZneophyte
flower
flower8blue
inner
inner8azure
inner
inner8white
morph
morph8zygo
petals
petalsZ4
stem
stem8round
sex
sexZbisexual

12th Sept 2006, Afton Down, Freshwater, IoW. Photo: (CC by 2.0) Mike Cotterill
Bird's-eye view of the sprawling spreading plant occupying gardens or arable fields and waste or otherwise disturbed soil.


25th March 2017, Brockworth, Gloucestershire. Photo: © Mike Baldwin
The stems grow from 10cm to 30cm long, occasionally to 50cm and can flower anytime between January to December.


6th Sept 2015, East Lancs Rd, Walkden, Gtr M/cr. Photo: © RWD
Another sprawling specimen.


21st April 2014, Arable Field, Rainford, Skelmersdale, Lancs. Photo: © RWD
Held aloft by your Author to get a clearer photo. The leaves are short stalks singly just beneath the long flower stalk where the flowers have all turned to fruit except those at the top. The fruits are in pairs (as usual for Speedwells) but are directed away from each other at a rather wide angle which gets wider as the seed pods mature.


3rd May 2017, Waterloo, Sefton Coast. Photo: © RWD
The seed pods are a pale reddish pink at first and oval in shape but slightly flattened in one plane. The plant is only sparsely hairy (on stem, pods and leaves).


6th Sept 2015, East Lancs Rd, Walkden, Gtr M/cr. Photo: © RWD
The flowers are a bright blue with deep-blue lines and a rather large white area in the centre. It is zygomorphic having a wide central petal, two similar sized (but slightly differing shape) side petals and a narrower lower petal. [This specimen is turned sideways on]


6th Sept 2015, East Lancs Rd, Walkden, Gtr M/cr. Photo: © RWD


25th March 2017, Brockworth, Gloucestershire. Photo: © Mike Baldwin
The flowers are solitary on the tip of a long stalk which emerges from just above the short stalk of a solitary leaf. These leaf-flower pairs are at intervals up the sparsely hairy stem.


25th March 2017, Brockworth, Gloucestershire. Photo: © Mike Baldwin


6th Sept 2015, East Lancs Rd, Walkden, Gtr M/cr. Photo: © RWD
There are just two white filaments with dull-blue T-bar anthers atop. The style is pink and white with a white discoidal stigma atop. Here the narrowest petal is white (they are not all blue) and the whiteness encroaches a little into the two side petals.


25th March 2017, Brockworth, Gloucestershire. Photo: © Mike Baldwin
Flower from beneath: large central petal top right, two slightly differently shaped petals either side if it. The narrow petal points to bottom left corner.

The sepals are in two pairs, the right-top two are narrower but slightly longer than the broader slightly shorter two at lower-left: which are directed at a greater angle away from each other than the top-right pair. Everything about them is zygomorphic. The leaves have a pale central vein (when viewed against the light) and perhaps two fainter veins curving either side.

The hairs on the stem are curved upwards whilst those on the leaf-edge are directed away from the stem and curved inwardly.



6th Sept 2015, East Lancs Rd, Walkden, Gtr M/cr. Photo: © RWD
The leaves are oval, coarsely-toothed and between 10 to 30mm long with rather short stalks (which are better seen from underneath).


6th Sept 2015, East Lancs Rd, Walkden, Gtr M/cr. Photo: © RWD
A sparsely hairy well-toothed leaf. The long flower stalk (top of photo) holds the seed pods between the two zygomorphic but bisymmetric sepals which have now turned from green to a dirty brown.


21st April 2014, Arable Field, Rainford, Skelmersdale, Lancs. Photo: © RWD
The two seed pods when they are ripe are held at an every increasing angle to each other, which exceeds 90°. The seed pods are also slightly hairy with curved hairs (no, not Curved Air - they were a 1970's pop group). The two un-equal longitudinally but now opposite pairs of leaves are also held at an increasing angle which is now nearly at 180°

[Whereas the seed pods of the otherwise similar Green Field-Speedwell lie at a much closer angle to each other]



21st April 2014, Arable Field, Rainford, Skelmersdale, Lancs. Photo: © RWD
The style (in the nick at the top of the paired fruits) is much longer than the shorter style of the otherwise similar Green Field-Speedwell.

It can be seen that the fruit hairs have tiny glandular tips (some of which are mysteriously blackend here).



25th March 2017, Brockworth, Gloucestershire. Photo: © Mike Baldwin
Here is the long and the short of the curved stem hairs as are the leaf hairs.


Unknown Date, Unknown Place. Photo: © RWD
Left: Green Field-Speedwell - Flowers/fruits on shorter stalk
Right: Common Field-Speedwell - Flowers/fruits on longer stalk


Unknown Date, Unknown Place. Photo: © RWD
Top: Green Field-Speedwell - Fruits ~parallel; style short
Bottom: Common Field-Speedwell - Fruits >90°; style long


Unknown Date, Unknown Place. Photo: (CC by 2.0) Geoff Toone
The stem leaves on short stalks held close to the stem and their diminutive fruits.


Unknown Date, Unknown Place. Photo: (CC by 2.0) Geoff Toone
The fruits of their hard labour.


Unknown Date, Unknown Place. Photo: (CC by 2.0) Geoff Toone
The two sets of 2, slightly differing, sepals.


Unknown Date, Unknown Place. Photo: (CC by 2.0) Geoff Toone
Fruits at > 90° angle to each other with short glandular hairs. 4 sepals with curved hairs but no glands.


Lookee-Likees : Green Field-Speedwell (Veronica agrestis) - see captions beneath photos for the differences - mainly in the length of leaf stalks and in the angle between the pair of opposite fruits.

No relation to : Field Maple (Acer campestre), Field Garlic (Allium oleraceum), Field Wormwood (Artemisia campestris), Field Brome (Bromus arvensis), Field Marigold (Calendula arvensis), Field Mouse-Ear (Cerastium arvense), Field Bindweed (Convolvulus arvensis), Field Horsetail (Equisetum arvense), Field Eryngo (Eryngium campestre), Field Gentian (Gentianella campestris), Field Scabious (Knautia arvensis), Field Pepperwort (Lepidium campestre), Field Gromwell (Lithospermum arvense), Field Wood-Rush (Luzula campestris), Field Cow-Wheat (Melampyrum arvense), Field Forget-me-Not (Myosotis arvensis), Field Rose (Rosa arvensis), Field Madder (Sherardia arvensis), Field Woundwort (Stachys arvensis), Field Fleawort (Tephroseris integrifolia), Field Penny-Cress (Thlaspi arvense), Field Pansy (Viola arvensis) [plants with similar names belonging to differing families].

It grows at altitudes between 0 and 350m above sea level.

Common Field-speedwell is an annual plant naturalised or cultivated in a variety of habitats such as gardens, and waste grounds of many sorts and was first recorded in the UK in 1825 but originates from South West Asia.


  Veronica persica  ⇐ Global Aspect ⇒ Plantaginaceae  

Distribution
 family8Plantain family8Plantaginaceae
 BSBI maps
genus8Veronica
Veronica
(Speedwells)

COMMON FIELD-SPEEDWELL

Veronica persica

Plantain Family [Plantaginaceae]