WATER MINT

Mentha aquatica

Mint / Dead-Nettle Family [Lamiaceae]  

month8jul month8july month8Aug month8sep month8sept

status
statusZnative
 
flower
flower8lilac
 
morph
morph8zygo
 
petals
petalsZ4
 
type
typeZglobed
 
type
typeZtieredwhorls
 
type
typeZspiked
 
stem
stem8square
 
smell
smell8aromatic
aromatic

1st Sept 2008, Freshwater Marsh, IOW Photo: (CC by 2.0) Mike Cotterill
These specimens in freshwater marshland rather than beside deeper canalside water.


7th August 2008, Leeds & Liverpool Canal, Rufford Branch Photo: © RWD
Beside deeper canalside water. The commonest waterside mint by far. It grows to 90cm high with lilac coloured whorls of flowers in 2 or three whorls at the top, often merging into a very short spike between 20 to 30mm across.


2nd August 2005, Leeds & Liverpool Canal, Rufford Branch Photo: © RWD
It grows up to 90cm high with the stems often purplish.


2nd August 2005, Leeds & Liverpool Canal, Rufford Branch Photo: © RWD
Some flower stalks are square but the main stalks here are round. The side branches develop flowers a bit later so are smaller here and not fully developed.


7th August 2008, Leeds & Liverpool Canal, Rufford Branch Photo: © RWD
The stems and leaf veins here are a deeper brownish-purple.


29th July 2007, Hollingworth Branch Canal, Daisy Nook, M/cr. Photo: © RWD
The leaves are oval and pointed at the tip, and may be sub-glabrous to densely hairy. The flowers are lilac coloured and here like boxing gloves - they are not open yet.


2nd August 2005, Leeds & Liverpool Canal, Rufford Branch Photo: © RWD
The flowers have 4 petals and anthers and a style which protrude beyond the corolla. This specimen with leaves barely hairy (but they can be very hairy).


2nd August 2005, Leeds & Liverpool Canal, Rufford Branch Photo: © RWD
The flowers usually have a globular cluster at the summit and another immediately below it, often merging into a slightly longer flower spike. A third cluster usually sits on top of the next leaf-pair axes with a good gap between the top cluster.


2nd August 2005, Leeds & Liverpool Canal, Rufford Branch Photo: © RWD
The sepals are 5-toothed, the teeth being longish, purple-brown and hairy. The sepal teeth are narrow. This specimen has leaves which are infected by some organism.


21st July 2006, Sefton Coastal Path, Formby Photo: © RWD
There are 4 T-bar pinkish anthers on thin, long white filaments. This specimen obligingly showing the 4 petals of just one flower facing the camera; most are yet to open. The lower globe has flowers which are still well inside the brown-purple sepal teeth.


29th July 2007, Hollingworth Branch Canal, Daisy Nook, M/cr. Photo: © RWD
A young specimen without flowers so far.


23rd Aug 2007, Roud, IOW. Photo: (CC by 2.0) Geoff Toone


15th Aug 2009, Afton Marsh, IOW. Photo: (CC by 2.0) Mike Cotterill


15th Aug 2009, Afton Marsh, IOW. Photo: (CC by 2.0) Mike Cotterill
The lilac calyx is 3 to 4.5mm long with 4 lilac petals inside of which are 4 splayed-out long white filaments with T-bar purplish anthers atop. The uppermost of the 4 petals may, or may not have a slight notch at the tip. The white stigmas are either missing or not as obvious - this specimen might be sterile, but usually Water Mint is fertile. Here the two whorls of flowers at the summit have merged into a longer inflorescence. The lowest whorl is off-frame below (as shown in the photo above this one).

The petals here have short hairs on the outside. The stem is very hairy.


Hybridizes with :

The flowers are normally fertile and have a strong and pleasant-smelling aroma which is nothing like that of spearmint.

Some similarities to other mints.


  Mentha aquatica  ⇐ Global Aspect ⇒ Lamiaceae  

Distribution
family8mint family8Dead-Nettle family8Labiatea family8Lamiaceae
 BSBI maps
genus8Mentha
Mentha
(Mints)

WATER MINT

Mentha aquatica

Mint / Dead-Nettle Family [Lamiaceae]  

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