categoryZShrubs Shrubs List 
categoryZBroadleaf Broadleaf List 
categoryZDeciduous Deciduous List 

JAPANESE ROSE

Rosa rugosa

Rose Family [Rosaceae]

Flowers:
month8jun month8june month8jul month8july

Fruit: edible cooked, acidic, astringent, rich in Vit C (20x > citrus)
month8jul month8july month8aug month8sep month8sept month8oct

category
category8Shrubs
category
category8Broadleaf
category
category8Deciduous
status
statusZneophyte

flower
flower8pink
 
inner
inner8cream
 
morph
morph8actino
 
petals
petalsZ5
 
stem
stem8round
 
smell
smell8fragra
fragrant
toxicity
toxicityZlowish
 
sex
sexZbisexual
 

8th July 2016, near Waterloo, Sefton Coast. Photo: © RWD
According to the book Japanese Rose are usually purple-pink and only rarely are they white. Here are both colours at approximately equal occurrence.


8th July 2016, near Waterloo, Sefton Coast. Photo: © RWD
It likes to occupy dunes near the sea, as here.


8th July 2016, near Waterloo, Sefton Coast. Photo: © RWD
The flowers are 60 to 80mm across when open. They have numerous creamy-yellow anthers splayed out in a circle from the central area.


8th July 2016, near Waterloo, Sefton Coast. Photo: © RWD
The numerous anthers on long white filaments.


8th July 2016, near Waterloo, Sefton Coast. Photo: © RWD
The flowers are usually reddish-pink.


27th July 2007, near Hall Road, Freshfield, Sefton Coast. Photo: © RWD
Japanese Rose spreads by underground


27th July 2007, near Hall Road, Freshfield, Sefton Coast. Photo: © RWD
Look at the numerous viscous spines all up the stem - bottom right.


27th July 2007, near Hall Road, Freshfield, Sefton Coast. Photo: © RWD
Later on in the season; some new flowers, some newly opened flowers all in the upper half of the photo and some gone to fruit (below midway).

The fruits, which are pale green to orange turning to red, are globular to compressed globular. They often hang downwards and are 1.5 to 2.5cm wide (up to 3cm on occasion).



29th June 2014, near Marina, Southport. Photo: © RWD
The leaves are in opposite pairs with a terminal leaf at the end. Usually with 7 leaflets.


19th May 2011, Blackleach Resr, Greater M/cr. Photo: © RWD
Although it sprawls across the ground claiming large areas, it can also get quite tall, up to 2m high.


19th May 2011, Blackleach Resr, Greater M/cr. Photo: © RWD
Albino versions also exist.


19th May 2011, Blackleach Resr, Greater M/cr. Photo: © RWD
The flowers are cupped by an almost spherical ovary which has 5 long, narrow, often twisting lobes being the calyx.


19th May 2011, Blackleach Resr, Walkden, Gtr. M/cr. Photo: © RWD
The flowers are between 6 to 9cm across.


19th May 2011, Blackleach Resr, Walkden, Gtr. M/cr. Photo: © RWD


19th May 2011, Blackleach Resr, Walkden, Gtr. M/cr. Photo: © RWD
The flower sits atop the almost-spherical ovary which is slightly compressed vertically into an oblate spheroid. This specimen lacks hairs, but strangely the specimen above this one does have a few longish hairs/bristles, whatever you wish to call them.

The outside of the 5 calyx lobes have much shorter hairs.

The pedicel (bottom part of flower stalk) is 1.5 to 2cm long and usually also has some gland-tipped acicles (aka gland-tipped needles or prickles).



19th May 2011, Blackleach Resr, Walkden, Gtr. M/cr. Photo: © RWD
The short hairs on the calyx lobes have tiny reddish globular glands at their tips, especially those near the base of the calyx. This is an as-yet unopened flower; the reddish petals are still held inside by the calyx lobes.

The hairs below the ovary are white and much shorter and without glands.



19th May 2011, Blackleach Resr, Walkden, Gtr. M/cr. Photo: © RWD
The 5 petals have fallen off the flower which is now displaying numerous white filaments with now-brown anthers.

Some parts of the branched leaf-stems have short sections of longish spiny hairs of various lengths sticking out. OUCH!



19th May 2011, Blackleach Resr, Walkden, Gtr. M/cr. Photo: © RWD
Bird's-eye view of a spent flower, the petals having fallen off leaving just the 5 long narrow sepals (which are 2 to 3cm long) - like a floundering starfish out of water. The tips of these sepals are slightly expanded.


14th June 2011, near Freshfields, Sefton Coast. Photo: © RWD


19th May 2011, Blackleach Resr, Walkden, Gtr. M/cr. Photo: © RWD
The top of the leaves are a dark-green and approximately oval in shape. They are bullate (meaning the top surface is raised into blisters). On the upper surface the leaves may be tomentose (being either densely covered in short soft hairs which are somewhat matted) to hairy.


19th May 2011, Blackleach Resr, Walkden, Gtr. M/cr. Photo: © RWD
The obverse of the leaves are paler-green (contrast those with the leaf at the very top showing the top darker-green surface). Leaves usually pinnate in 7's (although the bottom leaf has 8 leaflets, with an anomalous pair very close together in the upper half).

The serrations on the leaf edge are uniserrate (aka simple - not serrate serrations).



19th May 2011, Blackleach Resr, Walkden, Gtr. M/cr. Photo: © RWD
The underside of leaves, which are glandular hairy. The teeth are short, directed towards the tip and become more obviously teeth nearer the end of the leaflet.


19th May 2011, Blackleach Resr, Walkden, Gtr. M/cr. Photo: © RWD
Leaves have a dull sheen with veins curved forwards, vaguely wrinkly between the veins.


Hybridizes with :

  • Dog-rose (Rosa canina) to produce Rosa × praegeri, but only in 2 to 3 locations.

Some similarities to : Dutch Rose (Rosa 'Hollandica) but this has lighter-green leaves which are hardly bullate and with between 2 to 5 flowers clustered together and with petals which are dark or mauvish-red. It also has smaller fruits 0.8cm to 1.5cm which are usually longer than are wide (as opposed to 1.5 to 2.5cm or occasionally up to 3cm for Japanese Rose and which are usually wider than are long).


  Rosa rugosa  ⇐ Global Aspect ⇒ Rosaceae  

Distribution
 family8Rose family8Rosaceae
 BSBI maps
genus8Rosa
Rosa
(Rose)

JAPANESE ROSE

Rosa rugosa

Rose Family [Rosaceae]